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worldfreeads.com
  • Domain Name
    worldfreeads.com
  • Favicon
  • Google Page Rank
    2
  • Alexa Rank
    #45412
  • Page Size
    51.2 KB
  • Ip Address
    69.73.145.202
  • Heading
    H1: 0, H2: 0, H3: 0, H4: 0, H5: 0, H6: 0
  • Images
    36 GIF, 13 JPG, 0 PNG

Website Meta Analysis

  • Title
    World Free Ads - Free Classifieds
  • Meta Keyword
  • Meta Description
    home | my account | advanced search                                                                                                                             Welcome: Guest login here to post a free classified ad    home     register     ...

Technical Analysis

  • Webserver
    Apache
  • Ip Address
    69.73.145.202
  • Domain Age
    10 Years, 7 Months, 28 days.
  • Javascript Library
  • Language used
    HTML, CSS, Javascript

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) header show data header response from worldfreeads.com.

HTML Analysis

  • date: Wed, 13 Feb 2013 01:19:00 GMT
  • server: Apache
  • x-powered-by: PHP/5.3.19
  • vary: Accept-Encoding,User-Agent
  • content-encoding: gzip
  • content-length: 6749
  • content-type: text/html
  • x-google-cache-control: remote-fetch
  • via: HTTP/1.1 GWA
No data whois for worldfreeads.com

DNS Analysis


DNS servers
ns1-travis.nswebhost.com [69.73.145.169]
ns2-travis.nswebhost.com [69.73.145.201]


DNS Records

Answer records
worldfreeads.com TXT v=spf1 ip4:207.210.81.130 ip4:66.246.252.140 a mx a:travis.nswebhost.com mx:worldfreeads.com include:travis.nswebhost.com -all 14400s
worldfreeads.com MX
preference: 0
exchange: worldfreeads.com
14400s
worldfreeads.com SOA
server: ns1-travis.nswebhost.com
email: system@nswebhost.com
serial: 2011101200
refresh: 14400
retry: 7200
expire: 3600000
minimum ttl: 86400
14400s
worldfreeads.com NS  ns1-travis.nswebhost.com 14400s
worldfreeads.com NS  ns2-travis.nswebhost.com 14400s
worldfreeads.com A 69.73.145.202 14400s

Authority records

Additional records
worldfreeads.com A 69.73.145.202 14400s
ns1-travis.nswebhost.com A 69.73.145.169 14400s
ns2-travis.nswebhost.com A 69.73.145.201 14400s

IP 69.73.145.202 Analysis

  • Country Code
    US
  • Country Code3
    USA
  • Country Name
    United States
  • City
    Fulshear
  • Continent Code
    77441
  • Latitude
    281
  • Longitude
    618
  • #
    # Query terms are ambiguous. The query is assumed to be:
    # "n 69.73.145.202"
    #
    # Use "?" to get help.
    #

    #
    # The following results may also be obtained via:
    # http://whois.arin.net/rest/nets;q=69.73.145.202?showDetails=true&showARIN=false&ext=netref2
    #

    NetRange: 69.73.128.0 - 69.73.191.255
    CIDR: 69.73.128.0/18
    OriginAS: AS3595
    NetName: LH-GOLD-NETWORK
    NetHandle: NET-69-73-128-0-1
    Parent: NET-69-0-0-0-0
    NetType: Direct Allocation
    RegDate: 2003-11-05
    Updated: 2012-02-24
    Ref: http://whois.arin.net/rest/net/NET-69-73-128-0-1

    OrgName: Landis Holdings Inc
    OrgId: LANDI-3
    Address: PO BOX 1108
    City: Fulshear
    StateProv: TX
    PostalCode: 77441
    Country: US
    RegDate: 2008-10-24
    Updated: 2011-09-24
    Ref: http://whois.arin.net/rest/org/LANDI-3

    OrgTechHandle: ADMIN2505-ARIN
    OrgTechName: Admin and Abuse
    OrgTechPhone: +1-800-659-9585
    OrgTechEmail: abuse@nocdirect.com
    OrgTechRef: http://whois.arin.net/rest/poc/ADMIN2505-ARIN

    OrgAbuseHandle: ADMIN2505-ARIN
    OrgAbuseName: Admin and Abuse
    OrgAbusePhone: +1-800-659-9585
    OrgAbuseEmail: abuse@nocdirect.com
    OrgAbuseRef: http://whois.arin.net/rest/poc/ADMIN2505-ARIN

    #
    # ARIN WHOIS data and services are subject to the Terms of Use
    # available at: https://www.arin.net/whois_tou.html
    #

In Page Analysis

Traffic Analysis

Magestic Backlinks
Daily Ranks
Rank Trend
Visitor Trend
Bounce Trend

HTML Analysis

HTML validation
  • 227 Errors
  • 11 Warnings
Ratio Text/Html
  • 0.4740513446034802
Message Error
  • Error Line 1, Column 1: no document type declaration; implying "<!DOCTYPE HTML SYSTEM>"
    <html>

    The checked page did not contain a document type ("DOCTYPE") declaration. The Validator has tried to validate with a fallback DTD, but this is quite likely to be incorrect and will generate a large number of incorrect error messages. It is highly recommended that you insert the proper DOCTYPE declaration in your document -- instructions for doing this are given above -- and it is necessary to have this declaration before the page can be declared to be valid.

  • Error Line 3, Column 30: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <script language="JavaScript">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 35, Column 7: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <style>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 43, Column 30: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <script language="JavaScript"><!--

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 115, Column 17: there is no attribute "TOPMARGIN"
    <body topmargin=0 leftmargin=0 marginwidth=0 marginheight=0><table cellpadding=…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 115, Column 30: there is no attribute "LEFTMARGIN"
    <body topmargin=0 leftmargin=0 marginwidth=0 marginheight=0><table cellpadding=…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 115, Column 44: there is no attribute "MARGINWIDTH"
    … topmargin=0 leftmargin=0 marginwidth=0 marginheight=0><table cellpadding=0 ce…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 115, Column 59: there is no attribute "MARGINHEIGHT"
    …ftmargin=0 marginwidth=0 marginheight=0><table cellpadding=0 cellspacing=0 bor…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 115, Column 190: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …ing=0 cellspacing=3 border=0 width=100%><tr><td class=top_right_links><a href=…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 115, Column 292: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …ht_links>home</a> | <a href= index.php?a=4 class=top_right_links>my account</a…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 115, Column 354: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …ks>my account</a> | <a href= index.php?a=19 class=top_right_links>advanced sea…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 115, Column 490: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …ing=0 cellspacing=0 border=0 width=100%><tr><td><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPaddi…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 118, Column 11: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    <TD align=middle><A href="index.php"><IMG src="images/header/logo.jpg" border=0…

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 118, Column 80: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …><A href="index.php"><IMG src="images/header/logo.jpg" border=0></A> </TD></TR>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 122, Column 36: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td align=center><a href=index.php?a=23&banner_id=3 target=_blank>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Warning Line 123, Column 22: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    						<img src=images/banners/worldmap.gif border=0></a></td>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 123, Column 22: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    						<img src=images/banners/worldmap.gif border=0></a></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 125, Column 62: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …ing=0 cellspacing=3 border=0 width=100%><tr><td class=welcome_user><img style=…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 140, Column 96: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …ding=1 cellspacing=0 border=0 bgcolor=#E8F1FD background="images/misc/menu_bar…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 140, Column 115: there is no attribute "BACKGROUND"
    …0 border=0 bgcolor=#E8F1FD background="images/misc/menu_bar_bg.gif" width=980>…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Warning Line 142, Column 15: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    	<a href=http://www.worldfreeads.com/index.php?a=10 class=menu_bar><span style=…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 142, Column 173: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    …old; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">login here to post a free classified ad</span></a>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 143, Column 33: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    	&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href=http://www.worldfreeads.com/index.php class=menu_bar…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 143, Column 88: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    …bsp;&nbsp;<a href=http://www.worldfreeads.com/index.php class=menu_bar>home</a>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 145, Column 15: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    	<a href=http://www.worldfreeads.com/register.php class=menu_bar>register</a>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 145, Column 77: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    	<a href=http://www.worldfreeads.com/register.php class=menu_bar>register</a>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 147, Column 15: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    	<a href=http://www.worldfreeads.com/index.php?a=18 class=menu_bar>lost passwor…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 147, Column 84: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    …ref=http://www.worldfreeads.com/index.php?a=18 class=menu_bar>lost password</a>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 150, Column 15: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    	<a href=http://www.worldfreeads.com/index.php?a=19 class=menu_bar>search</a>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 150, Column 77: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    	<a href=http://www.worldfreeads.com/index.php?a=19 class=menu_bar>search</a>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 152, Column 8: end tag for element "FORM" which is not open
    	</form></td></tr></table></td></tr><tr>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 154, Column 53: there is no attribute "HEIGHT"
    	<table cellpadding=0 cellspacing=0 border=0 height=550 width=980>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 156, Column 34: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td width=37 valign=top bgcolor=#FFFFEA>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 157, Column 58: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<TABLE height="100%" cellSpacing=0 width="100%" bgColor=#ffffea border=0>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 164, Column 44: document type does not allow element "TABLE" here
     cellspacing="0" height="100%" width="100%">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 177, Column 31: document type does not allow element "SCRIPT" here; missing one of "TH", "TD" start-tag
    <script type="text/javascript"><!--

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Error Line 186, Column 62: document type does not allow element "SCRIPT" here; missing one of "TH", "TD" start-tag
    src="http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js">

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Error Line 201, Column 50: there is no attribute "BORDERCOLOR"
                                  <table bordercolor="#005ae1"

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 214, Column 15: document type does not allow element "FORM" here
     method="post"><input value="0"

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 215, Column 45: document type does not allow element "TBODY" here; assuming missing "TABLE" start-tag
     name="b[category_id]" type="hidden"> <tbody>
  • Error Line 235, Column 67: value of attribute "VALIGN" cannot be "CENTER"; must be one of "TOP", "MIDDLE", "BOTTOM", "BASELINE"
                                                    <tr valign="center">

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 244, Column 12: required attribute "ALT" not specified
     width="24"></a></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 260, Column 55: end tag for "TABLE" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
                                            </tbody></form>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 215, Column 39: start tag was here
     name="b[category_id]" type="hidden"> <tbody>
  • Error Line 261, Column 44: end tag for "TABLE" which is not finished
                                        </table>

    Most likely, you nested tags and closed them in the wrong order. For example <p><em>...</p> is not acceptable, as <em> must be closed before <p>. Acceptable nesting is: <p><em>...</em></p>

    Another possibility is that you used an element which requires a child element that you did not include. Hence the parent element is "not finished", not complete. For instance, in HTML the <head> element must contain a <title> child element, lists require appropriate list items (<ul> and <ol> require <li>; <dl> requires <dt> and <dd>), and so on.

  • Error Line 295, Column 51: required attribute "ALT" not specified
     src="images/misc/bullet.gif" height="8" width="8"></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 303, Column 51: required attribute "ALT" not specified
     src="images/misc/bullet.gif" height="8" width="8"></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 311, Column 51: required attribute "ALT" not specified
     src="images/misc/bullet.gif" height="8" width="8"></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 319, Column 51: required attribute "ALT" not specified
     src="images/misc/bullet.gif" height="8" width="8"></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 327, Column 51: required attribute "ALT" not specified
     src="images/misc/bullet.gif" height="8" width="8"></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 362, Column 54: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
                                        <td align="middle"><span

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 374, Column 12: required attribute "ALT" not specified
     width="24"></a></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 437, Column 33: end tag for "TABLE" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
                                </tr>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 163, Column 13: start tag was here
                <table bgcolor="#ffffea" border="0"
  • Error Line 437, Column 33: "TABLE" not finished but containing element ended
                                </tr>
  • Error Line 437, Column 33: end tag for "TABLE" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
                                </tr>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 161, Column 1: start tag was here
    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=3 width="100%" border=0>
  • Error Line 444, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …cellpadding=15 cellspacing=0 width=100% align=center><tr><td width=883 valign=…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 445, Column 55: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<table cellpadding=5 cellspacing=1 border=0 width=100%>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 474, Column 5: end tag for "SPAN" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    </td>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 472, Column 1: start tag was here
    <span style="font-family: arial; font-size: 10pt;">
  • Error Line 474, Column 5: end tag for "SPAN" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    </td>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 468, Column 396: start tag was here
    …s will be live online instantly</span><span style="font-family: arial; font-si…
  • Error Line 474, Column 5: end tag for "SPAN" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    </td>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 468, Column 27: start tag was here
    	<td valign=top height=20><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-fami…
  • Error Line 478, Column 55: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<table cellpadding=3 cellspacing=1 border=0 width=100% valign=top>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 478, Column 64: there is no attribute "VALIGN"
    	<table cellpadding=3 cellspacing=1 border=0 width=100% valign=top>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 480, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=3…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 480, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=371><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 480, Column 161: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Anno…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 481, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=34…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 481, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=341><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 481, Column 160: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Art …

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 484, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=3…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 484, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=340><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 484, Column 161: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Auto…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 485, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=40…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 485, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=402><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 485, Column 160: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Boat…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 488, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=3…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 488, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=381><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 488, Column 161: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Busi…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 489, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=39…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 489, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=396><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 489, Column 160: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Busi…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 492, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=3…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 492, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=395><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 492, Column 161: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Busi…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 493, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=34…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 493, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=342><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 493, Column 160: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Comp…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 496, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=3…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 496, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=397><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 496, Column 161: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Clot…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 497, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=40…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 497, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=403><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 497, Column 160: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Elec…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 500, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=4…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 500, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=404><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 500, Column 161: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Gift…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 501, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=40…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 501, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=405><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 501, Column 160: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Heal…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 504, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=4…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 504, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=406><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 504, Column 161: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Home…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 505, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=40…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 505, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=407><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 505, Column 160: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Inte…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 508, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=4…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 508, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=408><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 508, Column 161: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Misc…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 509, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=40…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 509, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=409><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 509, Column 160: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Musi…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 512, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=4…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 512, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=410><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 512, Column 161: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Pers…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 513, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=34…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 513, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=344><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 513, Column 160: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Pets…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 516, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=3…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 516, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=345><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 516, Column 161: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Real…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 517, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=41…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 517, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=411><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 517, Column 160: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Spor…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 520, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=4…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 520, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=412><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 520, Column 161: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Trav…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 521, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=41…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 521, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=413><img src="images/categories/f…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 521, Column 160: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … hspace=2 vspace=0 border=0 align=left><font class=browsing_category_name>Work…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 524, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<td valign=top width=20% class=browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=4…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 524, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …browsing_category_td><a href=index.php?a=5&b=414><font class=browsing_category…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 525, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20%>&nbsp;</td>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 537, Column 18: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<table width=100% cellpadding=0 cellspacing=0 border=0 align=center><tr>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 539, Column 68: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<table cellpadding=3 cellspacing=1 border=0 align=center width=100%>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 542, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20%>Title</td>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 546, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 546, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=303039><img src="user_images/5245…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 546, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/5245534.jpg" width="70" height="59" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 547, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=303039 class=browsing_result_table_body_even>COPD Res…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 553, Column 38: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    For more information, please...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 556, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 556, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=301297><img src="user_images/7170…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 556, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/7170225.jpg" width="70" height="59" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 557, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=301297 class=browsing_result_table_body_odd_bold>Don’…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 563, Column 18: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    For more...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 566, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 566, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=303073><img src="user_images/2657…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 566, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/2657281.jpg" width="61" height="60" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 567, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=303073 class=browsing_result_table_body_even_bold>Fai…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 570, Column 54: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    others are like minded, pressing towards the...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 573, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 573, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=302699><img src="user_images/2517…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 573, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/2517861.jpg" width="70" height="36" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 574, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=302699 class=browsing_result_table_body_odd_bold>Worl…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 579, Column 28: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    Sign up to day for...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 582, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 582, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=303011><img src="user_images/8023…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 582, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/8023170.gif" width="59" height="60" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 583, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=303011 class=browsing_result_table_body_even>Magic Se…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 586, Column 52: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    Illusions... OR of ANY Trick that you have...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 586, Column 57: end tag for "B" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    Illusions... OR of ANY Trick that you have...</font></td>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 585, Column 18: start tag was here
    		<td valign=top><B>Learn the Secrets of Famous Magic Tricks and
  • Error Line 589, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 589, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=302222><img src="user_images/6696…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 589, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/6696861.jpg" width="60" height="60" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 590, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=302222 class=browsing_result_table_body_odd>YOUNG LIV…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 593, Column 45: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    - Sponsor ID: 911438 Young Living's...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 598, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=303881 class=browsing_result_table_body_even_bold>Ins…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 601, Column 55: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    des symptômes douloureux associés à la goutte...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 604, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 604, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=302085><img src="user_images/6216…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 604, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/6216718.jpg" width="60" height="60" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 605, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=302085 class=browsing_result_table_body_odd_bold>Work…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 615, Column 20: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    EC1V 1JX  ...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 618, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 618, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=303322><img src="user_images/4542…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 618, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/4542138.jpg" width="70" height="20" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 619, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=303322 class=browsing_result_table_body_even_bold>Win…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 623, Column 24: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    Online General...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 626, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 626, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=301717><img src="user_images/1754…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 626, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/1754392.jpg" width="60" height="60" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 627, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=301717 class=browsing_result_table_body_odd>military …

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 631, Column 53: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    you and the special person in your life. Be...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 634, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 634, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=302167><img src="user_images/2936…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 634, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/2936152.jpg" width="60" height="60" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 635, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=302167 class=browsing_result_table_body_even>Start Ea…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 640, Column 41: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    It is an automatic online based...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 643, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 643, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=304385><img src="user_images/4203…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 643, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/4203801.jpg" width="40" height="60" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 644, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=304385 class=browsing_result_table_body_odd>win 500 d…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 646, Column 43: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    		<td valign=top>a shot at 500 cash </font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 649, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 649, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=303966><img src="user_images/3641…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 649, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/3641519.jpg" width="70" height="59" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 650, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=303966 class=browsing_result_table_body_even_bold> Me…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 653, Column 47: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    Gichtsymptomen, die trotz Medikamente...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 658, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=304182 class=browsing_result_table_body_odd>Work from…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 663, Column 33: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    Earn 1000$/day from the...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 676, Column 60: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td colspan=2><table cellpadding=0 cellspacing=1 width=100% border=0>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 679, Column 68: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<table cellpadding=3 cellspacing=1 border=0 align=center width=100%>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 682, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td valign=top width=20%>Title</td>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 686, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 686, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=304390><img src="user_images/8181…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 686, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/8181438.gif" width="60" height="60" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 687, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=304390 class=browsing_result_table_body_even>How You …

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 691, Column 35: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    How You Are At Risk Of Id...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 694, Column 38: duplicate specification of attribute "VALIGN"
    		<td valign=top align=center valign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=30…

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 694, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …lign=middle width=70><a href=index.php?a=2&b=304389><img src="user_images/4218…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 694, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …er_images/4218151.jpg" width="48" height="60" border=0></a></td><td valign=top>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 695, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    		<a href=index.php?a=2&b=304389 class=browsing_result_table_body_odd>How You C…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 699, Column 35: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    Easily With A Solar water...</font></td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 711, Column 34: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<td width=60 valign=top bgcolor=#FFFFEA>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 712, Column 58: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    	<TABLE height="100%" cellSpacing=0 width="100%" bgColor=#ffffea border=0>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 715, Column 21: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <TD width=1 bgColor=#ffcc00></TD>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 730, Column 18: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    <TD noWrap align=middle>

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 736, Column 12: value of attribute "VALIGN" cannot be "CENTER"; must be one of "TOP", "MIDDLE", "BOTTOM", "BASELINE"
    <TR vAlign=center>

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 742, Column 31: document type does not allow element "SCRIPT" here; missing one of "TH", "TD" start-tag
    <script type="text/javascript"><!--

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Error Line 751, Column 62: document type does not allow element "SCRIPT" here; missing one of "TH", "TD" start-tag
    src="http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js">

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Error Line 753, Column 7: end tag for element "SPAN" which is not open
    </SPAN></A></DIV></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR>…

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 753, Column 11: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    </SPAN></A></DIV></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR>…

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 753, Column 17: end tag for element "DIV" which is not open
    </SPAN></A></DIV></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR>…

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 753, Column 22: "TR" not finished but containing element ended
    </SPAN></A></DIV></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR>…
  • Error Line 753, Column 22: end tag for "TABLE" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    </SPAN></A></DIV></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR>…
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 738, Column 1: start tag was here
    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0>
  • Error Line 753, Column 94: end tag for element "FORM" which is not open
    …/TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></FORM></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 754, Column 11: end tag for element "TD" which is not open
    &nbsp;</td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 755, Column 6: end tag for element "TR" which is not open
    	</tr>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 756, Column 8: end tag for element "TABLE" which is not open
    </table>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 757, Column 5: end tag for element "TD" which is not open
    </td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 758, Column 5: end tag for element "TR" which is not open
    </tr>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 759, Column 4: document type does not allow element "TR" here
    <tr>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 792, Column 76: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …isc/ccards.gif" height="24" width="98"> <img src="images/misc/paypal.gif" heig…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 792, Column 134: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …isc/paypal.gif" height="24" width="78"></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></t…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 797, Column 8: end tag for element "TABLE" which is not open
    </table>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

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