Stafa Band Official Site, Spaceworthy Thrifty Amity Friendly Amatory, Music News & Rocktainment Online, free download music mp3 audio online, free song lyrics, download lagu gratis, free download mp3 gratis ...

stafaband.info
  • Domain Name
    stafaband.info
  • Favicon
  • Google Page Rank
    4
  • Alexa Rank
    #5988
  • Page Size
    42.4 KB
  • Ip Address
    184.173.241.146
  • Heading
    H1: 0, H2: 0, H3: 10, H4: 0, H5: 0, H6: 0
  • Images
    40 GIF, 11 JPG, 0 PNG

Website Meta Analysis

  • Title
    Welcome To STAFA Official Band Site - Music News & Rocktainment Online!
  • Meta Keyword
    stafa band, download, lagu, lirik, mp3, audio, streaming, lyrics, song, music, lagu gratis, mp3 gratis, free musik, free download mp3, free download lagu
  • Meta Description
    Stafa Band Official Site, Spaceworthy Thrifty Amity Friendly Amatory, Music News & Rocktainment Online, free download music mp3 audio online, free song lyrics, download lagu gratis, free download mp3 gratis

Technical Analysis

  • Webserver
    LiteSpeed
  • Ip Address
    184.173.241.146
  • Domain Age
    6 Years, 5 Months, 11 days.
  • Javascript Library
  • Language used
    HTML, CSS, Javascript

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) header show data header response from stafaband.info.

HTML Analysis

  • content-encoding: gzip
  • vary: Accept-Encoding
  • date: Tue, 03 Sep 2013 06:03:32 GMT
  • server: LiteSpeed
  • connection: Keep-Alive
  • x-powered-by: PHP/5.2.9
  • content-type: text/html
  • x-google-cache-control: remote-fetch
  • via: HTTP/1.1 GWA
Access to INFO WHOIS information is provided to assist persons in
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Domain ID:D17013319-LRMS
Domain Name:STAFABAND.INFO
Created On:27-Mar-2007 06:24:12 UTC
Last Updated On:07-Mar-2012 06:43:18 UTC
Expiration Date:27-Mar-2013 06:24:12 UTC
Sponsoring Registrar:PDR Ltd. dba PublicDomainRegistry.com (R159-LRMS)
Status:OK
Registrant ID:PP-SP-001
Registrant Name:Domain Admin
Registrant Organization:PrivacyProtect.org
Registrant Street1:ID#10760, PO Box 16
Registrant Street2:Note - All Postal Mails Rejected, visit Privacyprotect.org
Registrant Street3:
Registrant City:Nobby Beach
Registrant State/Province:
Registrant Postal Code:QLD 4218
Registrant Country:AU
Registrant Phone:+45.36946676
Registrant Phone Ext.:
Registrant FAX:
Registrant FAX Ext.:
Registrant Email: email
Admin ID:PP-SP-001
Admin Name:Domain Admin
Admin Organization:PrivacyProtect.org
Admin Street1:ID#10760, PO Box 16
Admin Street2:Note - All Postal Mails Rejected, visit Privacyprotect.org
Admin Street3:
Admin City:Nobby Beach
Admin State/Province:
Admin Postal Code:QLD 4218
Admin Country:AU
Admin Phone:+45.36946676
Admin Phone Ext.:
Admin FAX:
Admin FAX Ext.:
Admin Email: email
Billing ID:PP-SP-001
Billing Name:Domain Admin
Billing Organization:PrivacyProtect.org
Billing Street1:ID#10760, PO Box 16
Billing Street2:Note - All Postal Mails Rejected, visit Privacyprotect.org
Billing Street3:
Billing City:Nobby Beach
Billing State/Province:
Billing Postal Code:QLD 4218
Billing Country:AU
Billing Phone:+45.36946676
Billing Phone Ext.:
Billing FAX:
Billing FAX Ext.:
Billing Email: email
Tech ID:PP-SP-001
Tech Name:Domain Admin
Tech Organization:PrivacyProtect.org
Tech Street1:ID#10760, PO Box 16
Tech Street2:Note - All Postal Mails Rejected, visit Privacyprotect.org
Tech Street3:
Tech City:Nobby Beach
Tech State/Province:
Tech Postal Code:QLD 4218
Tech Country:AU
Tech Phone:+45.36946676
Tech Phone Ext.:
Tech FAX:
Tech FAX Ext.:
Tech Email: email
Name Server:NS1.STAFABAND.INFO
Name Server:NS2.STAFABAND.INFO
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:

DNS Analysis


DNS servers
ns2.stafaband.info [184.173.241.147]
ns1.stafaband.info [184.173.241.146]


DNS Records

Answer records
stafaband.info SOA
server: ns1.stafaband.info
email: admin@stafaband.info
serial: 2012113001
refresh: 7200
retry: 7200
expire: 1209600
minimum ttl: 86400
86400s
stafaband.info NS  ns1.stafaband.info 86400s
stafaband.info NS  ns2.stafaband.info 86400s
stafaband.info A 184.173.241.146 86400s
stafaband.info MX
preference: 5
exchange: alt1.aspmx.l.google.com
86400s
stafaband.info MX
preference: 5
exchange: alt2.aspmx.l.google.com
86400s
stafaband.info MX
preference: 10
exchange: aspmx2.googlemail.com
86400s
stafaband.info MX
preference: 10
exchange: aspmx3.googlemail.com
86400s
stafaband.info MX
preference: 1
exchange: aspmx.l.google.com
86400s

Authority records

Additional records
ns1.stafaband.info A 184.173.241.146 86400s
ns2.stafaband.info A 184.173.241.147 86400s

IP 184.173.241.146 Analysis

  • Country Code
    US
  • Country Code3
    USA
  • Country Name
    United States
  • City
    Houston
  • Continent Code
    77002
  • Latitude
    713
  • Longitude
    618
  • %rwhois V-1.5:003fff:00 rwhois.softlayer.com (by Network Solutions, Inc. V-1.5.9.5)
    network:Class-Name:network
    network:ID:NETBLK-SOFTLAYER.184.173.192.0/18
    network:Auth-Area:184.173.192.0/18
    network:Network-Name:SOFTLAYER-184.173.192.0
    network:IP-Network:184.173.241.144/29
    network:IP-Network-Block:184.173.241.144-184.173.241.151
    network:Organization;I:Stafa Rocktainment
    network:Street-Address:Sukarno Hatta 30 Kav 4
    network:City:Malang
    network:Postal-Code:65144
    network:Country-Code:ID
    network:Tech-Contact;I:sysadmins@softlayer.com
    network:Abuse-Contact;I:abuse@exelaz.com
    network:Admin-Contact;I:IPADM258-ARIN
    network:Created:2011-07-31 21:44:34
    network:Updated:2011-07-31 22:28:24
    network:Updated-By:ipadmin@softlayer.com

    %ok

In Page Analysis

Traffic Analysis

Magestic Backlinks
Daily Ranks
Rank Trend
Visitor Trend
Bounce Trend

HTML Analysis

HTML validation
  • 150 Errors
  • 6 Warnings
Ratio Text/Html
  • 0.6626647617291916
Message Error
  • Warning Line 5, Column 79: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <meta name="verify-v1" content="20JLXfvOolcqcwpuUaQInziokTAwaBnCkf06I+v5FqA=" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 5, Column 80: character data is not allowed here
    <meta name="verify-v1" content="20JLXfvOolcqcwpuUaQInziokTAwaBnCkf06I+v5FqA=" />

    You have used character data somewhere it is not permitted to appear. Mistakes that can cause this error include:

    • putting text directly in the body of the document without wrapping it in a container element (such as a <p>aragraph</p>), or
    • forgetting to quote an attribute value (where characters such as "%" and "/" are common, but cannot appear without surrounding quotes), or
    • using XHTML-style self-closing tags (such as <meta ... />) in HTML 4.01 or earlier. To fix, remove the extra slash ('/') character. For more information about the reasons for this, see Empty elements in SGML, HTML, XML, and XHTML.
  • Warning Line 19, Column 59: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="/styles.css" type="text/css" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 19, Column 60: character data is not allowed here
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="/styles.css" type="text/css" />

    You have used character data somewhere it is not permitted to appear. Mistakes that can cause this error include:

    • putting text directly in the body of the document without wrapping it in a container element (such as a <p>aragraph</p>), or
    • forgetting to quote an attribute value (where characters such as "%" and "/" are common, but cannot appear without surrounding quotes), or
    • using XHTML-style self-closing tags (such as <meta ... />) in HTML 4.01 or earlier. To fix, remove the extra slash ('/') character. For more information about the reasons for this, see Empty elements in SGML, HTML, XML, and XHTML.
  • Error Line 21, Column 14: element "CENTER" undefined
    <body><center>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 27, Column 27: there is no attribute "WIDTH"
                    <td width=58 height=106 style='background-image:url("/images/da…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 27, Column 37: there is no attribute "HEIGHT"
                    <td width=58 height=106 style='background-image:url("/images/da…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 28, Column 57: there is no attribute "BACKGROUND"
    …d style="padding-top:0px;" background="/images/darkSilver_07.gif" align=center…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 28, Column 104: duplicate specification of attribute "STYLE"
    …d="/images/darkSilver_07.gif" align=center style="background-repeat:repeat-x;">

    You have specified an attribute more than once. Example: Using the "height" attribute twice on the same "img" tag.

  • Error Line 29, Column 25: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                    <a href=/><img border=0 title='STAFA BAND - Spaceworthy Thrifty…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 29, Column 39: there is no attribute "BORDER"
                    <a href=/><img border=0 title='STAFA BAND - Spaceworthy Thrifty…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 40, Column 39: there is no attribute "BGCOLOR"
                    <TD COLSPAN=3 bgcolor=#222222>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 40, Column 39: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                    <TD COLSPAN=3 bgcolor=#222222>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 42, Column 53: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <a style='color:white;font:bold 10pt verdana;' href=/musiklegal>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 43, Column 7: element "BLINK" undefined
    <blink>TOKO MUSIK LEGAL</blink></a></div>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 67, Column 92: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width=100% style="font:normal 8pt verdana;">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 69, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_05.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 75, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_06.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 83, Column 88: there is no attribute "SIZE"
    … News & Rocktainment Online</div><hr size=1><script type="text/javascript"><!--

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 90, Column 135: there is no attribute "TARGET"
    …power-celebrities-tahun-2013/" target=_BLANK>Forbes Korea Memilih 40 Besar Pow…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 92, Column 12: there is no attribute "SIZE"
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 10:36:20 </font><br>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 92, Column 20: there is no attribute "COLOR"
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 10:36:20 </font><br>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 92, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 10:36:20 </font><br>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 92, Column 27: element "FONT" undefined
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 10:36:20 </font><br>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 95, Column 48: there is no attribute "ALIGN"
    …er=0 style='padding-right:5px;' align=left width=110 src="http://sidomi.com/wp…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 95, Column 126: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …-content/uploads/2013/02/urdfgfdl.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;fo…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 95, Column 144: there is no attribute "STYLE"
    …013/02/urdfgfdl.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;font-size:9pt;line-h…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 95, Column 196: element "FONT" undefined
    …fdl.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;font-size:9pt;line-height:17px;'>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 104, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 10:06:45 </font><br>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 104, Column 27: element "FONT" undefined
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 10:06:45 </font><br>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 107, Column 140: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ds/2013/02/Park-Shi-Hoo22-640x575.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;fo…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 107, Column 210: element "FONT" undefined
    …575.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;font-size:9pt;line-height:17px;'>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 116, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 08:50:08 </font><br>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 116, Column 27: element "FONT" undefined
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 08:50:08 </font><br>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 119, Column 156: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …Joong-Ki-Jo-In-Sung-Lee-Kwang-Soo.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;fo…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 119, Column 226: element "FONT" undefined
    …Soo.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;font-size:9pt;line-height:17px;'>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 128, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 07:59:58 </font><br>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 128, Column 27: element "FONT" undefined
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 07:59:58 </font><br>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 131, Column 159: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …sica-I-Got-a-Boy-Teaser-1-640x360.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;fo…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 131, Column 229: element "FONT" undefined
    …360.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;font-size:9pt;line-height:17px;'>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 140, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 07:20:25 </font><br>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 140, Column 27: element "FONT" undefined
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 07:20:25 </font><br>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 143, Column 141: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …s/2013/02/136179857888420_496x330.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;fo…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 143, Column 211: element "FONT" undefined
    …330.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;font-size:9pt;line-height:17px;'>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 152, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 07:19:27 </font><br>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 152, Column 27: element "FONT" undefined
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 07:19:27 </font><br>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 155, Column 158: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …dream-girl-mv-screencap-1-640x352.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;fo…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 155, Column 228: element "FONT" undefined
    …352.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;font-size:9pt;line-height:17px;'>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 164, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 05:28:16 </font><br>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 164, Column 27: element "FONT" undefined
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 05:28:16 </font><br>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 167, Column 138: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …oads/2013/02/cherry-belle-640x379.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;fo…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 167, Column 208: element "FONT" undefined
    …379.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;font-size:9pt;line-height:17px;'>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 176, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 04:05:58 </font><br>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 176, Column 27: element "FONT" undefined
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 04:05:58 </font><br>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 179, Column 146: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3/02/leeteuk-army-profile-picture.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;fo…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 179, Column 216: element "FONT" undefined
    …ure.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;font-size:9pt;line-height:17px;'>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 188, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 04:05:49 </font><br>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 188, Column 27: element "FONT" undefined
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 04:05:49 </font><br>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 191, Column 143: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …2013/02/iu_selca_close_up-300x216.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;fo…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 191, Column 213: element "FONT" undefined
    …216.jpg"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;font-size:9pt;line-height:17px;'>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 200, Column 20: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 02:48:17 </font><br>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 200, Column 27: element "FONT" undefined
    <font size=1 color=#00cc00>Thu, 28 Feb 2013 02:48:17 </font><br>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 203, Column 134: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/uploads/2013/02/Changmin-640x403.png"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;fo…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 203, Column 204: element "FONT" undefined
    …403.png"></a> <font style='letter-spacing:1px;font-size:9pt;line-height:17px;'>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 214, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 219, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 229, Column 92: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width=100% style="font:normal 8pt verdana;">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 231, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_05.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 237, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_06.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 253, Column 8: element "CENTER" undefined
    <center><script type="text/javascript"><!--

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 258, Column 10: there is no attribute "ALIGN"
    <p align=right>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 266, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 271, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 278, Column 92: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width=100% style="font:normal 8pt verdana;">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 280, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_05.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 286, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_06.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 301, Column 117: element "CENTER" undefined
    …> - <a href="/lirik/Andra_--_The_Backbone/Cliche/">Cliche</a></li></ul><center>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 311, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 316, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 325, Column 93: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width=100% style="font:normal 8pt verdana;">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 327, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_05.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 333, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_06.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 341, Column 8: element "CENTER" undefined
    <center>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 343, Column 9: element "CENTER" undefined
    	<center>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 345, Column 11: document type does not allow element "B" here; missing one of "P", "H1", "H2", "H3", "H4", "H5", "H6", "PRE", "DIV", "ADDRESS" start-tag
            <b>Search Now :</b>

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Error Line 346, Column 68: document type does not allow element "INPUT" here; missing one of "P", "H1", "H2", "H3", "H4", "H5", "H6", "PRE", "DIV", "ADDRESS" start-tag
    <input type=text class=formstafa size=30 name="artist" maxlength=50>

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Error Line 347, Column 54: document type does not allow element "INPUT" here; missing one of "P", "H1", "H2", "H3", "H4", "H5", "H6", "PRE", "DIV", "ADDRESS" start-tag
    <input type=hidden class=textbox size=30 name="title">

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Error Line 348, Column 65: document type does not allow element "INPUT" here; missing one of "P", "H1", "H2", "H3", "H4", "H5", "H6", "PRE", "DIV", "ADDRESS" start-tag
             <input type=submit class=formstafa value=Go name="cari"></font>

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Error Line 348, Column 72: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
             <input type=submit class=formstafa value=Go name="cari"></font>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 349, Column 12: end tag for "FORM" which is not finished
         </form>

    Most likely, you nested tags and closed them in the wrong order. For example <p><em>...</p> is not acceptable, as <em> must be closed before <p>. Acceptable nesting is: <p><em>...</em></p>

    Another possibility is that you used an element which requires a child element that you did not include. Hence the parent element is "not finished", not complete. For instance, in HTML the <head> element must contain a <title> child element, lists require appropriate list items (<ul> and <ol> require <li>; <dl> requires <dt> and <dd>), and so on.

  • Error Line 360, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 365, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 369, Column 92: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width=100% style="font:normal 8pt verdana;">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 371, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_05.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 377, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_06.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 385, Column 6: document type does not allow element "HTML" here
    <html>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 386, Column 15: there is no attribute "BGCOLOR"
    <body bgcolor=black>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 386, Column 20: document type does not allow element "BODY" here
    <body bgcolor=black>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 387, Column 13: there is no attribute "SRC"
    <iframe src=/01 height=530 frameborder=0 width=100% scrolling=no></iframe>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 387, Column 13: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <iframe src=/01 height=530 frameborder=0 width=100% scrolling=no></iframe>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 387, Column 24: there is no attribute "HEIGHT"
    <iframe src=/01 height=530 frameborder=0 width=100% scrolling=no></iframe>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 387, Column 40: there is no attribute "FRAMEBORDER"
    <iframe src=/01 height=530 frameborder=0 width=100% scrolling=no></iframe>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 387, Column 48: there is no attribute "WIDTH"
    <iframe src=/01 height=530 frameborder=0 width=100% scrolling=no></iframe>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 387, Column 51: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <iframe src=/01 height=530 frameborder=0 width=100% scrolling=no></iframe>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 387, Column 63: there is no attribute "SCROLLING"
    <iframe src=/01 height=530 frameborder=0 width=100% scrolling=no></iframe>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 387, Column 65: element "IFRAME" undefined
    <iframe src=/01 height=530 frameborder=0 width=100% scrolling=no></iframe>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 388, Column 7: end tag for "BODY" which is not finished
    </body>

    Most likely, you nested tags and closed them in the wrong order. For example <p><em>...</p> is not acceptable, as <em> must be closed before <p>. Acceptable nesting is: <p><em>...</em></p>

    Another possibility is that you used an element which requires a child element that you did not include. Hence the parent element is "not finished", not complete. For instance, in HTML the <head> element must contain a <title> child element, lists require appropriate list items (<ul> and <ol> require <li>; <dl> requires <dt> and <dd>), and so on.

  • Error Line 389, Column 7: end tag for "HTML" which is not finished
    </html>

    Most likely, you nested tags and closed them in the wrong order. For example <p><em>...</p> is not acceptable, as <em> must be closed before <p>. Acceptable nesting is: <p><em>...</em></p>

    Another possibility is that you used an element which requires a child element that you did not include. Hence the parent element is "not finished", not complete. For instance, in HTML the <head> element must contain a <title> child element, lists require appropriate list items (<ul> and <ol> require <li>; <dl> requires <dt> and <dd>), and so on.

  • Error Line 395, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 400, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 414, Column 92: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width=100% style="font:normal 8pt verdana;">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 416, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_05.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 422, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_06.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 432, Column 8: element "CENTER" undefined
    <center>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 433, Column 63: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    …ect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1"></script><fb:like href="http://www.face…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 433, Column 87: there is no attribute "HREF"
    …ll.js#xfbml=1"></script><fb:like href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Stafa…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 433, Column 157: there is no attribute "LAYOUT"
    …es/The-Stafa-Band/127424850622351" layout="box_count" width="60"></fb:like><br>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 433, Column 175: there is no attribute "WIDTH"
    …es/The-Stafa-Band/127424850622351" layout="box_count" width="60"></fb:like><br>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 433, Column 179: element "FB:LIKE" undefined
    …es/The-Stafa-Band/127424850622351" layout="box_count" width="60"></fb:like><br>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Warning Line 465, Column 14: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <a href=http://www.musikindie.com rel=nofollow target=_BLANK>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 466, Column 15: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src=http://profile.ak.fbcdn.net/hprofile-ak-snc4/372963_191444540930962_11…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 466, Column 15: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src=http://profile.ak.fbcdn.net/hprofile-ak-snc4/372963_191444540930962_11…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 467, Column 12: element "CENTER" undefined
    <br><center>Join MUSIK INDIE</center>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 468, Column 4: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    </a>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 469, Column 12: element "CENTER" undefined
    <br><center>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 471, Column 23: element "FONT" undefined
    <br><font color=orange>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 474, Column 12: element "BLINK" undefined
    Hub: <blink>081230934155</blink>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 483, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 488, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 492, Column 95: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width=100% style="font:normal 8pt verdana;">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 494, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_05.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 500, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_06.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 523, Column 8: element "CENTER" undefined
    <center>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 524, Column 9: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <a href=/e?d=http://jurnalisfoto.org target=_BLANK>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 525, Column 10: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <img src=/images/jfi-stafa.jpg border=0 alt='Jurnalis Foto Indonesia' title='Ju…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 526, Column 9: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <a href=/ru?u=http://tokojamunik.com rel=nofollow target=_BLANK><img src=/tokoj…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 526, Column 74: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …ojamunik.com rel=nofollow target=_BLANK><img src=/tokojamunik.gif border=0></a>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 526, Column 99: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ojamunik.com rel=nofollow target=_BLANK><img src=/tokojamunik.gif border=0></a>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 536, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 541, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 545, Column 92: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width=100% style="font:normal 8pt verdana;">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 547, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_05.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 553, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_06.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 562, Column 67: element "CENTER" undefined
    <div class=ldhead1>.:: site statistics ::.</div><hr size=1><center>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 564, Column 44: there is no attribute "LANGUAGE"
      <script  type="text/javascript" language="javascript"> 

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 570, Column 5: end tag for element "A" which is not open
     </a> 

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 583, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 588, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 592, Column 7: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <style>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 592, Column 7: document type does not allow element "STYLE" here
    <style>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 596, Column 92: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width=100% style="font:normal 8pt verdana;">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 598, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_05.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 604, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="/images/darkSilverFooter_06.gif"><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04b.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 687, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_01.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 692, Column 50: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    			<td><img src="/images/darkSilverFooter_04.gif">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 698, Column 58: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …/stafaband.info/digital.php" width=100% height=13 scrolling=no frameborder=0><…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 698, Column 96: element "IFRAME" undefined
    …and.info/digital.php" width=100% height=13 scrolling=no frameborder=0></iframe>

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 716, Column 24: element "CENTER" undefined
                    <center>&copy; May 2007 - 2013. Stafa Band Crew. admin@stafaban…

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 723, Column 7: end tag for "BODY" which is not finished
    </body>

    Most likely, you nested tags and closed them in the wrong order. For example <p><em>...</p> is not acceptable, as <em> must be closed before <p>. Acceptable nesting is: <p><em>...</em></p>

    Another possibility is that you used an element which requires a child element that you did not include. Hence the parent element is "not finished", not complete. For instance, in HTML the <head> element must contain a <title> child element, lists require appropriate list items (<ul> and <ol> require <li>; <dl> requires <dt> and <dd>), and so on.

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