Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan is an effort to universalize elementary education by community-ownership of the school system. It is a response to the demand for quality basic education all over the country. The ...

ssapunjab.org
  • Domain Name
    ssapunjab.org
  • Favicon
  • Google Page Rank
    4
  • Alexa Rank
    #69741
  • Page Size
    29.1 KB
  • Ip Address
    180.179.201.23
  • Heading
    H1: 0, H2: 0, H3: 0, H4: 0, H5: 0, H6: 0
  • Images
    6 GIF, 4 JPG, 0 PNG

Website Meta Analysis

  • Title
    :: Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan - Punjab (INDIA) ::
  • Meta Keyword
  • Meta Description
      Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan is an effort to universalize elementary education by community-ownership of the school system. It is a response to the demand for quality basic education all over the country. The SSA program is also an attempt to provide ...

Technical Analysis

  • Webserver
    Apache/2.2.23 (Unix) mod_ssl/2.2.23 OpenSSL/0.9.8e-fips-rhel5 mod_auth_passthrough/2.1 mod_bwlimited/1.4 FrontPage/5.0.2.2635
  • Ip Address
    180.179.201.23
  • Domain Age
  • Javascript Library
  • Language used
    HTML, CSS, Javascript

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) header show data header response from ssapunjab.org.

HTML Analysis

  • date: Fri, 22 Feb 2013 04:36:41 GMT
  • server: Apache/2.2.23 (Unix) mod_ssl/2.2.23 OpenSSL/0.9.8e-fips-rhel5 mod_auth_passthrough/2.1 mod_bwlimited/1.4 FrontPage/5.0.2.2635
  • last-modified: Mon, 18 Feb 2013 16:47:38 GMT
  • etag: "fc40e1-89a1-4d6027b8d9e80"
  • accept-ranges: bytes
  • content-length: 35233
  • content-type: text/html
  • age: 19
  • x-google-cache-control: remote-cache-hit
  • via: HTTP/1.1 GWA (remote cache hit)
No data whois for ssapunjab.org

DNS Analysis


DNS servers
ns.ocpdns.com [209.44.115.6]
ns2.ocpdns.com [209.44.115.7]


DNS Records

Answer records
ssapunjab.org SOA
server: ns.ocpnds.com
email: admin@ns.ocpnds.com
serial: 2012102101
refresh: 3600
retry: 1800
expire: 864000
minimum ttl: 3600
86400s
ssapunjab.org NS  ns.ocpdns.com 86400s
ssapunjab.org NS  ns2.ocpdns.com 86400s
ssapunjab.org A 180.179.201.23 86400s
ssapunjab.org MX
preference: 10
exchange: mail.ssapunjab.org
86400s

Authority records

Additional records
ns.ocpdns.com A 209.44.115.6 86400s
ns2.ocpdns.com A 209.44.115.7 86400s
mail.ssapunjab.org A 180.179.201.23 86400s

IP 180.179.201.23 Analysis

  • Country Code
  • Country Code3
  • Country Name
  • City
  • Continent Code
  • Latitude
  • Longitude
  • No whois ip data for 180.179.201.23

In Page Analysis

Traffic Analysis

Magestic Backlinks
Daily Ranks
Rank Trend
Visitor Trend
Bounce Trend

HTML Analysis

HTML validation
  • 100 Errors
  • 15 Warnings
Ratio Text/Html
  • 0.722640494756655
Message Error
  • Warning Line 8, Column 42: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <LINK media=all href="site.css" type=text/css rel=stylesheet>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 9, Column 17: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <STYLE type=text/css media=all>@import url( /en/css/site.css );

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 9, Column 17: document type does not allow element "STYLE" here
    <STYLE type=text/css media=all>@import url( /en/css/site.css );

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 10, Column 8: end tag for element "STYLE" which is not open
    </STYLE>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 13, Column 17: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <STYLE type=text/css media=all>BODY {

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 13, Column 17: document type does not allow element "STYLE" here
    <STYLE type=text/css media=all>BODY {

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 25, Column 8: end tag for element "STYLE" which is not open
    </STYLE>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 27, Column 55: document type does not allow element "META" here
    <META content="Microsoft FrontPage 6.0" name=GENERATOR>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 29, Column 10: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    type=text/javascript></SCRIPT>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 31, Column 30: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <SCRIPT LANGUAGE="JavaScript"><!--

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 74, Column 7: end tag for element "HEAD" which is not open
    </HEAD>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 75, Column 15: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <BODY bgColor=#fce9ca onLoad="runSlideShow()">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 75, Column 46: document type does not allow element "BODY" here
    <BODY bgColor=#fce9ca onLoad="runSlideShow()">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 81, Column 10: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    type=text/javascript></SCRIPT>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 88, Column 27: there is no attribute "HEIGHT"
          &nbsp;<TABLE height=58 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="778" border=0 s…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 93, Column 85: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …order="0" src="picture/Top.jpg" width="773" height="88" align="left"></TD></TR>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 96, Column 22: there is no attribute "BACKGROUND"
              background=picture/welcomback.gif 

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Warning Line 96, Column 29: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
              background=picture/welcomback.gif 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 99, Column 26: there is no attribute "ONMOUSEOVER"
        <MARQUEE onmouseover=scrollAmount=2 onmouseout=scrollAmount=4 width="773" >…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 99, Column 38: an attribute specification must start with a name or name token
        <MARQUEE onmouseover=scrollAmount=2 onmouseout=scrollAmount=4 width="773" >…

    An attribute name (and some attribute values) must start with one of a restricted set of characters. This error usually indicates that you have failed to add a closing quotation mark on a previous attribute value (so the attribute value looks like the start of a new attribute) or have used an attribute that is not defined (usually a typo in a common attribute name).

  • Error Line 99, Column 38: element "MARQUEE" undefined
        <MARQUEE onmouseover=scrollAmount=2 onmouseout=scrollAmount=4 width="773" >…

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Error Line 107, Column 22: there is no attribute "NAME"
              <FORM name=search action=/en/search/index.mc method=get>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 107, Column 36: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
              <FORM name=search action=/en/search/index.mc method=get>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 107, Column 66: document type does not allow element "FORM" here; missing one of "TH", "TD" start-tag
              <FORM name=search action=/en/search/index.mc method=get>

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Error Line 108, Column 44: value of attribute "VALIGN" cannot be "CENTER"; must be one of "TOP", "MIDDLE", "BOTTOM", "BASELINE"
              <TD class=textindentation vAlign=center noWrap align=left width=307 

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Warning Line 109, Column 29: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
              background=picture/searchbackground.gif bgColor=#f8c663 style="border…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 109, Column 29: document type does not allow element "TD" here
              background=picture/searchbackground.gif bgColor=#f8c663 style="border…

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 112, Column 30: required attribute "ALT" not specified
                width=17 border=0></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 113, Column 44: value of attribute "VALIGN" cannot be "CENTER"; must be one of "TOP", "MIDDLE", "BOTTOM", "BASELINE"
              <TD class=textindentation vAlign=center noWrap align=left width="454" 

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Warning Line 114, Column 29: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
              background=picture/welcomback.gif bgColor=#ebebeb style="border-top-s…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 117, Column 45: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
              <TD align=right background=picture/welcomback.gif 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 122, Column 38: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
        <TD vAlign=top width=171 bgColor=#fedc97 height="595"><!-- BEGIN: /en/defau…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 123, Column 60: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …LE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=171 bgColor=#fff6e9 border=0 height="385">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 126, Column 67: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …ontable width=162 height="24" bgColor=#f8c663>&nbsp;<B class=nav1><font color=…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 126, Column 179: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c="../picture/new.gif" width="18" height="7"></font></b><FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 126, Column 203: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …c="../picture/new.gif" width="18" height="7"></font></b><FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 127, Column 96: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …></FONT><B class=nav1>Grievance&nbsp; Redressal Cell</b><FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 129, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …                 <font color="#b10000">&#187;</font></b><FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 132, Column 73: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …                <font color="#b10000">&#187; </font></b><FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 135, Column 27: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                		<FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 137, Column 73: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …                <font color="#b10000">&#187; </font></b><FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 143, Column 71: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …        <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24"><FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 146, Column 78: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    … <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24">&nbsp; <FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 149, Column 78: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    … <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24">&nbsp; <FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 152, Column 78: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    … <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24">&nbsp; <FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 155, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …       <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24"> <FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 160, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …       <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24"> <FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 163, Column 78: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    … <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24">&nbsp; <FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 166, Column 67: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …gationtable width=162 height="24" bgColor=#f8c663>&nbsp;<FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 166, Column 93: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …gationtable width=162 height="24" bgColor=#f8c663>&nbsp;<FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 168, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …                 <font color="#b10000">&#187;</font></b><FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 171, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …                 <font color="#b10000">&#187;</font></b><FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 174, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …                 <font color="#b10000">&#187;</font></b><FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 176, Column 27: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                		<FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 178, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …                 <font color="#b10000">&#187;</font></b><FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 184, Column 16: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    			<FONT color=#aa0000>	

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 196, Column 98: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …alogo.jpg" align="right" width="159" height="42"></P></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 201, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …       <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24"> <FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 202, Column 54: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                class=nav>&nbsp;&nbsp; <a onmouseover=stm(Text[1],Style[2]) 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 203, Column 51: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …"TEXT-DECORATION: none" onmouseout=htm() href="sub pages/links.htm">USEFUL LIN…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 205, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …       <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24"> <FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 206, Column 54: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                class=nav>&nbsp;&nbsp; <a onmouseover=stm(Text[0],Style[1]) 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 207, Column 51: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …"TEXT-DECORATION: none" onmouseout=htm() href="sub pages/dise.htm">DISE & MIS<…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 210, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …       <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24"> <FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 211, Column 54: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                class=nav>&nbsp;&nbsp; <a onmouseover=stm(Text[2],Style[3]) 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 212, Column 51: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …"TEXT-DECORATION: none" onmouseout=htm() href="sub pages/rti.htm">RTI/Court Ca…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 215, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …       <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24"> <FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 216, Column 54: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                class=nav>&nbsp;&nbsp; <a onmouseover=stm(Text[3],Style[4]) 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 217, Column 51: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …    style="TEXT-DECORATION: none" onmouseout=htm() href="sub pages/pictes.htm">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 221, Column 72: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …       <TD class=navigationtable width=162 height="24"> <FONT color=#aa0000><B 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 223, Column 51: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …    style="TEXT-DECORATION: none" onmouseout=htm() href="sub pages/edusat.htm">

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 231, Column 63: end tag for "B" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
              <p align="left">&nbsp;<B class=nav1>Quick Links </TD></TR>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 231, Column 33: start tag was here
              <p align="left">&nbsp;<B class=nav1>Quick Links </TD></TR>
  • Error Line 241, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …bsp;<img border="0" src="../picture/new.gif" width="18" height="7"></font> </b>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 242, Column 16: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    			<FONT color=#aa0000><B class=nav1>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 243, Column 102: end tag for "B" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    …tructions.htm">Daily Instructions</a> &nbsp;</b></FONT><B class=nav1></TD></TR>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 243, Column 84: start tag was here
    …tructions.htm">Daily Instructions</a> &nbsp;</b></FONT><B class=nav1></TD></TR>
  • Error Line 246, Column 40: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
              <p align="left"> <FONT color=#aa0000><B class=nav1>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 257, Column 29: value of attribute "VALIGN" cannot be "CENTER"; must be one of "TOP", "MIDDLE", "BOTTOM", "BASELINE"
              <TD valign="center" align=center width="184" height="56">

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 258, Column 105: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …sys/Count.cgi?df=web7000.dat|display=Counter|ft=6|md=10|frgb=247;159;26|dd=G"> 

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 261, Column 77: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    				<img border="0" src="../picture/ssaFaceBook.jpg" width="168" height="31">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 267, Column 43: end tag for element "B" which is not open
    	<!-- END: /en/default_left.mi --></TD></B>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 271, Column 38: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
        <TD vAlign=top width=594 bgColor=#ffffff height="595" style="border-right-s…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 285, Column 21: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
              <TD align=middle width="234" height="227" bordercolor="#008000">

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 285, Column 65: there is no attribute "BORDERCOLOR"
              <TD align=middle width="234" height="227" bordercolor="#008000">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 286, Column 125: there is no attribute "BORDERCOLOR"
    …0; border-collapse: collapse; " bordercolor="#FFCC66" width="80%" height="102">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 290, Column 76: there is no attribute "NAME"
    … <img border="0" src="images/1.jpg" width="183" height="193" NAME="SlideShow"> 

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 290, Column 87: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … <img border="0" src="images/1.jpg" width="183" height="193" NAME="SlideShow"> 

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 364, Column 27: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
                    <TD align=middle width="100%" height="12" bgcolor="#FEDC97">

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 373, Column 24: value of attribute "VALIGN" cannot be "CENTER"; must be one of "TOP", "MIDDLE", "BOTTOM", "BASELINE"
                    vAlign=center noWrap align=right width="100%">&nbsp;<table cell…

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 375, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 389, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="0" src="picture/new.gif" width="18" height="7"><font color="#aa0000"> </font>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 398, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 414, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 428, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="0" src="picture/new.gif" width="18" height="7"><font color="#aa0000"> </font>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 445, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="0" src="picture/new.gif" width="18" height="7"><font color="#aa0000"> </font>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 452, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 468, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 506, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 522, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 561, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 577, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Warning Line 590, Column 128: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …cases of promotions from Master to Lecturer (By DPI-SE)</font></b></u><br /><b>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 612, Column 36: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    																History</A></b><br /><b>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 634, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 639, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Warning Line 661, Column 19: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    														<br /> - <A 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 670, Column 19: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    														<br /> 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 682, Column 19: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    														<br /> 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 703, Column 19: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    														<br /> - <A 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 714, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 719, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 724, Column 51: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
    …        <td vAlign="top" align="middle" width="19" style="border-right-style: …

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 732, Column 29: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                    <TD bgColor=#000000 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 734, Column 26: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
        <TD width=43 bgColor=#f8c663 height="595" style="border-style:none; border-…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 738, Column 15: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
        <TD align=middle>

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 742, Column 70: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …Copyright.bmp" width="200" height="23"></P></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><!-- END:…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

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