Mersul trenurilor Rute interne       Data 27-Iunie-2013 28-Iunie-2013 29-Iunie-2013 30-Iunie-2013 1-Iulie-2013 2-Iulie-2013 3-Iulie-2013 4-Iulie-2013 5-Iulie-2013 6-Iulie-2013 7-Iulie-2013 8-Iulie-2013 9-Iulie-2013 10-Iulie-2013 11-Iulie-2013 ... ...

infofer.ro
  • Domain Name
    infofer.ro
  • Favicon
  • Google Page Rank
    7
  • Alexa Rank
    #73921
  • Page Size
    29.3 KB
  • Ip Address
    193.230.156.7
  • Heading
    H1: 0, H2: 0, H3: 0, H4: 0, H5: 0, H6: 0
  • Images
    10 GIF, 23 JPG, 0 PNG

Website Meta Analysis

  • Title
    Mersul trenurilor
  • Meta Keyword
  • Meta Description
        Mersul trenurilor Rute interne       Data 27-Iunie-2013 28-Iunie-2013 29-Iunie-2013 30-Iunie-2013 1-Iulie-2013 2-Iulie-2013 3-Iulie-2013 4-Iulie-2013 5-Iulie-2013 6-Iulie-2013 7-Iulie-2013 8-Iulie-2013 9-Iulie-2013 10-Iulie-2013 11-Iulie-2013 ...

Technical Analysis

  • Webserver
    Microsoft-IIS/6.0
  • Ip Address
    193.230.156.7
  • Domain Age
  • Javascript Library
  • Language used
    HTML, CSS, Javascript

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) header show data header response from infofer.ro.

HTML Analysis

  • date: Thu, 27 Jun 2013 12:01:52 GMT
  • server: Microsoft-IIS/6.0
  • microsoftofficewebserver: 5.0_Pub
  • content-length: 35259
  • content-type: text/html
  • cache-control: private
  • x-google-cache-control: remote-fetch
  • via: HTTP/1.1 GWA
No data whois for infofer.ro

DNS Analysis


DNS servers
ns.cfr.ro [193.230.156.5]
ns1.cfr.ro [193.230.156.15]


DNS Records

Answer records
infofer.ro A 193.230.156.7 3600s
infofer.ro NS  ns.infofer.ro 3600s
infofer.ro NS  ns-2.ines.ro 3600s
infofer.ro NS  ns-1.ines.ro 3600s
infofer.ro NS  ns1.infofer.ro 3600s
infofer.ro SOA
server: it0dns1
email: admin@cfr.ro
serial: 137
refresh: 900
retry: 600
expire: 86400
minimum ttl: 3600
3600s
infofer.ro MX
preference: 10
exchange: smtp1.infofer.ro
3600s
infofer.ro MX
preference: 10
exchange: smtp2.infofer.ro
3600s
infofer.ro MX
preference: 20
exchange: mail1.infofer.ro
3600s
infofer.ro TXT v=spf1 mx ~all 3600s

Authority records

Additional records
ns.infofer.ro A 193.230.156.5 3600s
ns-2.ines.ro A 80.86.96.11 27111s
ns-2.ines.ro 28 [16 bytes] 1874s
ns-1.ines.ro A 80.86.96.1 51164s
ns-1.ines.ro 28 [16 bytes] 51164s
ns1.infofer.ro A 193.230.156.15 3600s
smtp1.infofer.ro A 193.230.156.53 3600s
smtp2.infofer.ro A 193.230.156.54 3600s
mail1.infofer.ro A 193.230.156.56 3600s

IP 193.230.156.7 Analysis

  • Country Code
    RO
  • Country Code3
    ROU
  • Country Name
    Romania
  • City
    Bucharest
  • Continent Code
    EU
  • Latitude
    44.4333
  • Longitude
    26.1.
  • No whois ip data for 193.230.156.7

In Page Analysis

Traffic Analysis

Magestic Backlinks
Daily Ranks
Rank Trend
Visitor Trend
Bounce Trend

HTML Analysis

HTML validation
  • 138 Errors
  • 6 Warnings
Ratio Text/Html
  • 0.6403043347682451
Message Error
  • Warning Line 7, Column 79: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <meta name="verify-v1" content="0XHHypp9imVgXjOJZID/JmMGfERIrpml+j1TPQmfIOg=" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 7, Column 80: character data is not allowed here
    <meta name="verify-v1" content="0XHHypp9imVgXjOJZID/JmMGfERIrpml+j1TPQmfIOg=" />

    You have used character data somewhere it is not permitted to appear. Mistakes that can cause this error include:

    • putting text directly in the body of the document without wrapping it in a container element (such as a <p>aragraph</p>), or
    • forgetting to quote an attribute value (where characters such as "%" and "/" are common, but cannot appear without surrounding quotes), or
    • using XHTML-style self-closing tags (such as <meta ... />) in HTML 4.01 or earlier. To fix, remove the extra slash ('/') character. For more information about the reasons for this, see Empty elements in SGML, HTML, XML, and XHTML.
  • Error Line 9, Column 19: value of attribute "HTTP-EQUIV" invalid: "1" cannot start a name
    <meta http-equiv="1" content="Informatica feroviara,Mersul trenurilor, Contacte…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Error Line 10, Column 47: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <script language="JavaScript" src="loading.js"></script>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 12, Column 28: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <SCRIPT language=JavaScript>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 55, Column 42: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <LINK href="infofer/normal.css" type=text/css rel=stylesheet><LINK 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 55, Column 43: character data is not allowed here
    <LINK href="infofer/normal.css" type=text/css rel=stylesheet><LINK 

    You have used character data somewhere it is not permitted to appear. Mistakes that can cause this error include:

    • putting text directly in the body of the document without wrapping it in a container element (such as a <p>aragraph</p>), or
    • forgetting to quote an attribute value (where characters such as "%" and "/" are common, but cannot appear without surrounding quotes), or
    • using XHTML-style self-closing tags (such as <meta ... />) in HTML 4.01 or earlier. To fix, remove the extra slash ('/') character. For more information about the reasons for this, see Empty elements in SGML, HTML, XML, and XHTML.
  • Warning Line 56, Column 37: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    href="images_X/primul.css" type=text/css rel=stylesheet><LINK 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 57, Column 37: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    href="images_X/primul.css" type=text/css rel=stylesheet>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 78, Column 12: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <BODY text=#000000 bottomMargin=0 vLink=#000000 link=#000000 bgColor=#336699 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 78, Column 33: there is no attribute "BOTTOMMARGIN"
    <BODY text=#000000 bottomMargin=0 vLink=#000000 link=#000000 bgColor=#336699 

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 78, Column 41: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <BODY text=#000000 bottomMargin=0 vLink=#000000 link=#000000 bgColor=#336699 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 78, Column 54: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <BODY text=#000000 bottomMargin=0 vLink=#000000 link=#000000 bgColor=#336699 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 78, Column 70: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <BODY text=#000000 bottomMargin=0 vLink=#000000 link=#000000 bgColor=#336699 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 79, Column 12: there is no attribute "LEFTMARGIN"
    leftMargin=0 topMargin=0 

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 79, Column 24: there is no attribute "TOPMARGIN"
    leftMargin=0 topMargin=0 

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 81, Column 13: there is no attribute "RIGHTMARGIN"
    rightMargin=0>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 84, Column 70: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" align=center bgColor=#e9e9e9 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 89, Column 21: there is no attribute "HEIGHT"
          <TABLE height=8 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" align=center 

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 90, Column 15: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
          bgColor=#336699 border=0>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 93, Column 39: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                  <TD width="35%" bgColor=#336699><a href="http://www.infofer.ro"><…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 93, Column 144: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ro"><img src="images_X/sigla7.gif" width="165" height="62" border="0"></a></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 94, Column 39: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                  <TD width="35%" bgColor=#336699><div align="left"></div></TD>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 102, Column 17: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
        <TD bgColor=#336699>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 104, Column 15: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
          bgColor=#e9e9e9 border=0>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 109, Column 34: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                align=center bgColor=#e9e9e9 border=0>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 112, Column 29: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                    <TD bgColor=#e9e9e9 height=12>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 116, Column 33: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                        <TR bgColor=#003366>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 118, Column 229: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …,'','images_X/tren_on.jpg',1)" onMouseOut="MM_swapImgRestore()"></a></DIV></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 119, Column 254: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …re','','images_X/solutii_on.jpg',1)" onMouseOut="MM_swapImgRestore()"></a></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 120, Column 268: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …i','','images_X/servicii_on.jpg',1)" onMouseOut="MM_swapImgRestore()"></a></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 121, Column 254: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …d','','images_X/contacte_on.jpg',1)" onMouseOut="MM_swapImgRestore()"></a></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 122, Column 262: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …','','images_X/parteneri_on.jpg',1)" onMouseOut="MM_swapImgRestore()"></a></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 123, Column 255: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …e('web','','images_X/web_on.jpg',1)" onMouseOut="MM_swapImgRestore()"></a></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 124, Column 261: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …','','images_X/desprenoi_on.jpg',1)" onMouseOut="MM_swapImgRestore()"></a></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 125, Column 131: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …m"><img src="images_X/cariere.jpg" width="110" height="15" border="0"></a></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 128, Column 27: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                      bgColor=#e9e9e9 border=0>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 132, Column 81: there is no attribute "NAME"
    …<img src="images_X/tren_off.jpg" name="tren" width="110" height="70" id="tren"…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 132, Column 121: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …mages_X/tren_off.jpg" name="tren" width="110" height="70" id="tren"></DIV></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 133, Column 134: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …es_X/solutii_off.jpg" name="servere" width="110" height="70" id="servere"></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 134, Column 137: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …X/servicii_off.jpg" name="servicii" width="110" height="70" id="servicii"></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 135, Column 129: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …"images_X/contacte_off.jpg" name="hand" width="110" height="70" id="hand"></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 136, Column 140: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …arteneri_off.jpg" name="parteneri" width="110" height="70" id="parteneri"></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 137, Column 122: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …mg src="images_X/web_off.jpg" name="web" width="110" height="70" id="web"></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 138, Column 131: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …mages_X/home_off.jpg" name="centrul" width="110" height="70" id="centrul"></TD>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 145, Column 35: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                          <TD bgColor=#003366 height=3>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 148, Column 70: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" align=center bgColor=#336699 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 154, Column 15: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
          bgColor=#ffffff border=0>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 157, Column 32: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
              <TD vAlign=top align=middle width="26%" bgColor=#e9e9e9 height=633>

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 157, Column 59: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
              <TD vAlign=top align=middle width="26%" bgColor=#e9e9e9 height=633>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 161, Column 33: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                        <TR bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 169, Column 131: there is no attribute "BORDERCOLOR"
    …border="0" align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" bordercolor="e9e9e9">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 170, Column 64: there is no attribute "NAME"
    …       <form style="DISPLAY: inline" name=filter action="R2.asp" method="POST">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 170, Column 100: document type does not allow element "FORM" here
    …       <form style="DISPLAY: inline" name=filter action="R2.asp" method="POST">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 171, Column 34: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                                  <tr> 

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 172, Column 150: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …lign="right"><img src="images_X/colturi.jpg" width="32" height="32"></div></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 173, Column 61: there is no attribute "BORDERCOLOR"
    …          <td width="30%" bordercolor="#D3D3D3" bgcolor="#D3D3D3" class=footer…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 175, Column 123: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ign="left"><img src="images_X/colturi_r.jpg" width="32" height="32"></div></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 177, Column 34: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                                  <tr>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 280, Column 34: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                                  <tr> 

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 287, Column 34: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                                  <tr> 

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 294, Column 34: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                                  <tr> 

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 302, Column 34: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                                  <tr> 

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 306, Column 109: there is no attribute "WIDTH"
    … onClick="submit()" src="images_X/cautare_on5.jpg" width="80" height="22"></td>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 306, Column 121: there is no attribute "HEIGHT"
    … onClick="submit()" src="images_X/cautare_on5.jpg" width="80" height="22"></td>

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 306, Column 130: end tag for "DIV" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    … onClick="submit()" src="images_X/cautare_on5.jpg" width="80" height="22"></td>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 305, Column 55: start tag was here
                                    <td bgcolor="#D3D3D3"><div align="left">
  • Error Line 314, Column 45: there is no attribute "BORDERCOLOR"
                                <tr bordercolor="#003366"> 

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 315, Column 43: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                                  <td bgcolor=#D3D3D3 class=footerText>&nbsp;</td>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 317, Column 75: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    					href="Itrn.asp"><img src="images_X/a_336699.gif" width="9" height="8"> 

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 319, Column 43: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                                  <td bgcolor=#D3D3D3 class=footerText><a 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 322, Column 43: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                                  <td bgcolor=#D3D3D3 class=footerText>&nbsp;</td>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 325, Column 55: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …                   <td width="14%" bgcolor=#D3D3D3 class=footerText>&nbsp;</td>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 326, Column 172: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ISta.asp"><img src="images_X/a_336699.gif" width="9" height="8"></a></div></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 327, Column 55: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …              <td width="12%" bgcolor=#D3D3D3 class=footerText><div align="lef…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 329, Column 43: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                                  <td bgcolor=#D3D3D3 class=footerText>&nbsp;</td>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 332, Column 43: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …                          <td bgcolor=#e9e9e9 class=footerText><img src="image…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 332, Column 125: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …lass=footerText><img src="images_X/colturi_ls.jpg" width="32" height="32"></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 334, Column 43: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …                            <td bgcolor=#D3D3D3><div align="center"></div></td>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 335, Column 43: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …                          <td bgcolor=#D3D3D3 class=footerText><img src="image…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 335, Column 125: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …lass=footerText><img src="images_X/colturi_rd.jpg" width="32" height="32"></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 347, Column 33: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                        <tr bgcolor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 355, Column 99: end tag for element "IMG" which is not open
    …gle.com/logos/Logo_25wht.gif" border="0" alt="Google" align="middle"></img></a>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 357, Column 80: end tag for element "INPUT" which is not open
    <input type="text" name="q" size="20" maxlength="255" value="" id="sbi"></input>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 359, Column 64: end tag for element "INPUT" which is not open
    <input type="submit" name="sa" value="Cautare" id="sbb"></input>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 360, Column 72: end tag for element "INPUT" which is not open
    <input type="hidden" name="client" value="pub-2016799769229071"></input>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 361, Column 52: end tag for element "INPUT" which is not open
    <input type="hidden" name="forid" value="1"></input>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 362, Column 58: end tag for element "INPUT" which is not open
    <input type="hidden" name="ie" value="ISO-8859-2"></input>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 363, Column 58: end tag for element "INPUT" which is not open
    <input type="hidden" name="oe" value="ISO-8859-2"></input>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 364, Column 184: end tag for element "INPUT" which is not open
    …:336699;ALC:0000FF;LC:0000FF;T:000000;GFNT:0000FF;GIMP:0000FF;FORID:1"></input>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 365, Column 50: end tag for element "INPUT" which is not open
    <input type="hidden" name="hl" value="ro"></input>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 381, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br /><br /></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 381, Column 11: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br /><br /></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 382, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 392, Column 8: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <script>t_rid="infoferro";</script>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 393, Column 52: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <script src="http://storage.trafic.ro/js/trafic.js"></script>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 410, Column 46: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                        <TR class=normal bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 416, Column 50: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                  <TD vAlign=top width="52%" bgColor=#ffffff rowSpan=2> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 421, Column 29: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                    <TD bgColor=#ffffff height=1>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 437, Column 279: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …,resizable=yes,width=300,height=300')"></a><a href="javascript:;"><img src="im…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 437, Column 391: ID "DETALII" already defined
    …" width="9" height="8" border="0" id="detalii" onClick="MM_openBrWindow('detal…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 437, Column 160: ID "DETALII" first defined here
    …" width="9" height="8" border="0" id="detalii" onClick="MM_openBrWindow('detal…
  • Error Line 437, Column 510: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …,resizable=yes,width=300,height=300')"></a><a href="javascript:;"><img src="im…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 437, Column 622: ID "DETALII" already defined
    …" width="9" height="8" border="0" id="detalii" onClick="MM_openBrWindow('detal…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 437, Column 160: ID "DETALII" first defined here
    …" width="9" height="8" border="0" id="detalii" onClick="MM_openBrWindow('detal…
  • Error Line 437, Column 741: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …,'detalii','scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=300,height=300')"></a></p></td> 

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 455, Column 160: ID "DETALII" already defined
    …" width="9" height="8" border="0" id="detalii" onClick="MM_openBrWindow('detal…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 437, Column 160: ID "DETALII" first defined here
    …" width="9" height="8" border="0" id="detalii" onClick="MM_openBrWindow('detal…
  • Error Line 455, Column 282: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …,resizable=yes,width=300,height=300')"></a><a href="javascript:;"><img src="im…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 455, Column 394: ID "DETALII" already defined
    …" width="9" height="8" border="0" id="detalii" onClick="MM_openBrWindow('detal…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 437, Column 160: ID "DETALII" first defined here
    …" width="9" height="8" border="0" id="detalii" onClick="MM_openBrWindow('detal…
  • Error Line 455, Column 516: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …,resizable=yes,width=300,height=300')"></a><a href="javascript:;"><img src="im…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 455, Column 628: ID "DETALII" already defined
    …" width="9" height="8" border="0" id="detalii" onClick="MM_openBrWindow('detal…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 437, Column 160: ID "DETALII" first defined here
    …" width="9" height="8" border="0" id="detalii" onClick="MM_openBrWindow('detal…
  • Error Line 455, Column 750: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …','detalii','scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=300,height=300')"></a></p></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 508, Column 46: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
              <TD vAlign=top width="22%" bgColor=#e9e9e9 height=779 rowSpan=2>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 512, Column 33: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                        <TR bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 514, Column 62: there is no attribute "DWCOPYTYPE"
    border=0 align=center cellPadding=0 cellSpacing=0 dwcopytype="CopyTableRow">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 516, Column 41: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                                <TR bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 517, Column 164: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c="images_X/vanzonline.jpg" width="148" height="110" border="0" usemap="#Map9">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 519, Column 126: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="rect" coords="30,32,138,70" href="http://www.cfrcalatori.ro" target="_blank">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 526, Column 33: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                        <TR bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 530, Column 33: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                        <TR bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 534, Column 54: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                                <TR class=normal bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 535, Column 59: there is no attribute "BACKGROUND"
    …          <TD width="100%" background=#e9e9e9> <DIV align=center><img src="ima…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 535, Column 59: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …          <TD width="100%" background=#e9e9e9> <DIV align=center><img src="ima…

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 535, Column 171: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c="images_X/rez_online.jpg" width="148" height="110" border="0" usemap="#Map8">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 537, Column 141: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …"30,40,144,62" href="https://bilete.cfrcalatori.ro/rezervare/" target="_blank">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 539, Column 59: end tag for "A" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
                                  <a href="javascript:;"></DIV></TD>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 539, Column 31: start tag was here
                                  <a href="javascript:;"></DIV></TD>
  • Error Line 544, Column 33: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                        <TR bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 547, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …         <area shape="rect" coords="3,5,148,110" href="under_construction.htm">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 552, Column 13: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <TR bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 553, Column 169: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …name="harta" width="148" height="109" border="0" usemap="#hartaMap" id="harta">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 554, Column 164: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …9" href="http://statiicfr.cfrcalatori.ro/vizualizarestatiicf/" target="_blank">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 555, Column 106: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    … <area shape="rect" coords="14,3,141,27" href="variant12.html" target="_blank">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 556, Column 138: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …,143,103" href="http://statiicfr.cfrcalatori.ro/shapefilessl/" target="_blank">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 561, Column 13: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <TR bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 564, Column 13: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <TR bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 565, Column 143: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …="images_X/galerii_red.jpg" width="148" height="110" border="0" usemap="#Map6">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 576, Column 33: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                        <TR bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 579, Column 33: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                        <TR bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 587, Column 26: end tag for "TBODY" which is not finished
                      </TBODY>

    Most likely, you nested tags and closed them in the wrong order. For example <p><em>...</p> is not acceptable, as <em> must be closed before <p>. Acceptable nesting is: <p><em>...</em></p>

    Another possibility is that you used an element which requires a child element that you did not include. Hence the parent element is "not finished", not complete. For instance, in HTML the <head> element must contain a <title> child element, lists require appropriate list items (<ul> and <ol> require <li>; <dl> requires <dt> and <dd>), and so on.

  • Error Line 592, Column 46: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
                        <TR class=normal bgColor=#e9e9e9> 

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 605, Column 45: end tag for "DIV" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
                <P align=center><BR><BR></P></TD></TR>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 601, Column 13: start tag was here
                <DIV align=center>
  • Error Line 607, Column 32: value of attribute "ALIGN" cannot be "MIDDLE"; must be one of "LEFT", "CENTER", "RIGHT", "JUSTIFY", "CHAR"
              <TD vAlign=top align=middle width="26%" bgColor=#e9e9e9 height=17>

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

  • Error Line 607, Column 59: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
              <TD vAlign=top align=middle width="26%" bgColor=#e9e9e9 height=17>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 614, Column 17: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
        <TD bgColor=#e9e9e9 height=10>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 617, Column 55: required attribute "ALT" not specified
      <area shape="rect" coords="141,175,144,178" href="#">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 621, Column 42: unclosed start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …area shape="rect" coords="4,7,149,108"<a href="javascript:;" onClick="MM_openB…

    The construct <foo<bar> is valid in HTML (it is an example of the rather obscure “Shorttags” feature) but its use is not recommended. In most cases, this is a typo that you will want to fix. If you really want to use shorttags, be aware that they are not well implemented by browsers.

  • Error Line 621, Column 42: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …area shape="rect" coords="4,7,149,108"<a href="javascript:;" onClick="MM_openB…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 621, Column 168: document type does not allow element "A" here
    …iant12.html','harta','scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=620,height=480')"></a>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 623, Column 71: document type does not allow element "TABLE" here
    </BODY></HTML><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 626, Column 17: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
        <TD bgColor=#e9e9e9 height=20>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 630, Column 21: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
            <TR bgColor=#003366>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 644, Column 16: document type does not allow element "MAP" here
    <map name="Map">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 645, Column 6: end tag for "MAP" which is not finished
    </map>

    Most likely, you nested tags and closed them in the wrong order. For example <p><em>...</p> is not acceptable, as <em> must be closed before <p>. Acceptable nesting is: <p><em>...</em></p>

    Another possibility is that you used an element which requires a child element that you did not include. Hence the parent element is "not finished", not complete. For instance, in HTML the <head> element must contain a <title> child element, lists require appropriate list items (<ul> and <ol> require <li>; <dl> requires <dt> and <dd>), and so on.

  • Error Line 646, Column 17: document type does not allow element "MAP" here
    <map name="Map2">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 647, Column 73: required attribute "ALT" not specified
      <area shape="rect" coords="3,3,32,15" href="default_engleza.asp?lng=2">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 649, Column 17: document type does not allow element "MAP" here
    <map name="Map3">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 650, Column 98: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …" coords="3,4,147,108" href="http://www.cfr.ro/infofer/under_construction.htm">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

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