Go.com is the top-level home on the Internet to the online properties of The Walt Disney Company. ...

go.com
  • Domain Name
    go.com
  • Favicon
  • Google Page Rank
    8
  • Alexa Rank
    #60
  • Page Size
    57 KB
  • Ip Address
    68.71.220.3
  • Heading
    H1: 0, H2: 9, H3: 0, H4: 0, H5: 0, H6: 0
  • Images
    0 GIF, 0 JPG, 11 PNG

Website Meta Analysis

  • Title
    Go.com | The Walt Disney Company
  • Meta Keyword
  • Meta Description
    Go.com is the top-level home on the Internet to the online properties of The Walt Disney Company.

Technical Analysis

  • Webserver
    Apache/2.2.3 (Red Hat)
  • Ip Address
    68.71.220.3
  • Domain Age
    15 Years, 8 Months, 22 days.
  • Javascript Library
    jquery
  • Language used
    HTML, CSS, Javascript

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) header show data header response from go.com.

HTML Analysis

  • server: Apache/2.2.3 (Red Hat)
  • x-served-by: n7-z01-0a2a10a6
  • x-powered-by: PHP/5.3.3
  • x-drupal-cache: HIT
  • etag: "1378730830-0"
  • content-language: en
  • link: ; rel="shortlink",; rel="canonical"
  • cache-control: public, max-age=3600
  • last-modified: Mon, 09 Sep 2013 12:47:10 +0000
  • vary: Cookie,Accept-Encoding
  • content-encoding: gzip
  • content-type: text/html; charset=utf-8
  • content-length: 10302
  • accept-ranges: bytes
  • date: Mon, 09 Sep 2013 14:10:27 GMT
  • x-varnish: 2462473829 2462244296
  • age: 3177
  • via: 1.1 varnish
  • connection: keep-alive
  • x-varnish-cache: HIT
  • x-google-cache-control: remote-fetch

Domain Name.......... go.com
Creation Date........ 1998-01-09
Registration Date.... 2010-01-14
Expiry Date.......... 2013-01-09
Organisation Name.... Disney Enterprises Inc.
Organisation Address. 500 S. Buena Vista Street
Organisation Address.
Organisation Address.
Organisation Address. Burbank
Organisation Address. 91521
Organisation Address. CA
Organisation Address. UNITED STATES

Admin Name........... dig.com .
Admin Address........ 506 2ND AVE STE 2100
Admin Address........
Admin Address........
Admin Address. SEATTLE
Admin Address........ 98104-2300
Admin Address........ WA
Admin Address........ UNITED STATES
Admin Email.......... email
Admin Phone.......... +1.2066644000
Admin Fax............ +1.2066644009

Tech Name............ dig.com .
Tech Address......... 506 2ND AVE STE 2100
Tech Address.........
Tech Address.........
Tech Address......... SEATTLE
Tech Address......... 98104-2300
Tech Address......... WA
Tech Address......... UNITED STATES
Tech Email........... email
Tech Phone........... +1.2066644000
Tech Fax............. +1.2066644009
Name Server.......... SENS02.DIG.COM
Name Server.......... SENS01.DIG.COM
Name Server.......... ORNS02.DIG.COM
Name Server.......... ORNS01.DIG.COM


DNS Analysis


DNS servers
sens01.dig.com [199.181.134.16]
sens02.dig.com [199.181.135.199]
orns01.dig.com [68.71.223.14]
orns02.dig.com [68.71.223.15]


DNS Records

Answer records
go.com SOA
server: sens01.dig.com
email: [email protected]
serial: 2013071152
refresh: 1200
retry: 180
expire: 1209600
minimum ttl: 300
300s
go.com A 68.71.220.3 300s
go.com NS  sens01.dig.com 300s
go.com NS  orns01.dig.com 300s
go.com NS  orns02.dig.com 300s
go.com NS  sens02.dig.com 300s
go.com MX
preference: 0
exchange: mx.go.com.cust.b.hostedemail.com
300s

Authority records

Additional records
orns01.dig.com A 68.71.223.14 300s
orns02.dig.com A 68.71.223.15 300s
sens01.dig.com A 199.181.134.16 300s
sens02.dig.com A 199.181.135.199 300s

IP 68.71.220.3 Analysis

  • Country Code
  • Country Code3
  • Country Name
  • City
  • Continent Code
  • Latitude
  • Longitude
  • No whois ip data for 68.71.220.3

In Page Analysis

Traffic Analysis

Magestic Backlinks
Daily Ranks
Rank Trend
Visitor Trend
Bounce Trend

HTML Analysis

HTML validation
  • 57 Errors
  • 5 Warnings
Ratio Text/Html
  • 0.5305643170597916
Message Error
  • Warning Line 7, Column 242: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …, and Movies from the top sources on the web. Make GO your home page today!" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 8, Column 271: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …milies, Games, Dating, Relationships, Finance, Stock Quotes, Email, Toolbar" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 8, Column 271: document type does not allow element "META" here
    …milies, Games, Dating, Relationships, Finance, Stock Quotes, Email, Toolbar" />

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 10, Column 83: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ta name="verify-v1" content="EP0KWZ2MLrV0OzwqRt9YtEd2OG5U6URBIAF224DrE9M=" />  

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 10, Column 83: document type does not allow element "META" here
    …ta name="verify-v1" content="EP0KWZ2MLrV0OzwqRt9YtEd2OG5U6URBIAF224DrE9M=" />  

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 11, Column 51: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
        <META name="y_key" content="1b349656cb06cfba" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 11, Column 51: document type does not allow element "META" here
        <META name="y_key" content="1b349656cb06cfba" />

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 12, Column 48: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
        <link rel="canonical" href="http://go.com/"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 12, Column 48: document type does not allow element "LINK" here
        <link rel="canonical" href="http://go.com/"/>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 15, Column 27: document type does not allow element "STYLE" here
        <style type="text/css">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 435, Column 34: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
        <script language="javascript">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 582, Column 9: end tag for element "HEAD" which is not open
      </head>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 583, Column 21: there is no attribute "MARGINWIDTH"
      <body marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" leftmargin="0" topmargin="0" bgcolor="…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 583, Column 38: there is no attribute "MARGINHEIGHT"
      <body marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" leftmargin="0" topmargin="0" bgcolor="…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 583, Column 53: there is no attribute "LEFTMARGIN"
    …width="0" marginheight="0" leftmargin="0" topmargin="0" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" onLo…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 583, Column 67: there is no attribute "TOPMARGIN"
    …inheight="0" leftmargin="0" topmargin="0" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" onLoad="setFocus()…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 583, Column 108: document type does not allow element "BODY" here
    …nheight="0" leftmargin="0" topmargin="0" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" onLoad="setFocus()">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 585, Column 83: there is no attribute "BORDERCOLOR"
    …dth="770" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center" bordercolor="#CDCDCD">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 600, Column 55: there is no attribute "BACKGROUND"
    …d width="770" height="100" background="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 601, Column 151: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="200" height="95" border="0"></a></div>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 605, Column 101: cannot generate system identifier for general entity "name"
    …nsfer.go.com/cgi/transfer.dll?srvc=go&name=makeHP_button&goto=http://go.com/st…

    An entity reference was found in the document, but there is no reference by that name defined. Often this is caused by misspelling the reference name, unencoded ampersands, or by leaving off the trailing semicolon (;). The most common cause of this error is unencoded ampersands in URLs as described by the WDG in "Ampersands in URLs".

    Entity references start with an ampersand (&) and end with a semicolon (;). If you want to use a literal ampersand in your document you must encode it as "&amp;" (even inside URLs!). Be careful to end entity references with a semicolon or your entity reference may get interpreted in connection with the following text. Also keep in mind that named entity references are case-sensitive; &Aelig; and &aelig; are different characters.

    If this error appears in some markup generated by PHP's session handling code, this article has explanations and solutions to your problem.

    Note that in most documents, errors related to entity references will trigger up to 5 separate messages from the Validator. Usually these will all disappear when the original problem is fixed.

  • Error Line 605, Column 101: general entity "name" not defined and no default entity
    …nsfer.go.com/cgi/transfer.dll?srvc=go&name=makeHP_button&goto=http://go.com/st…

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Error Line 605, Column 105: reference to entity "name" for which no system identifier could be generated
    …r.go.com/cgi/transfer.dll?srvc=go&name=makeHP_button&goto=http://go.com/static…

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Info Line 605, Column 100: entity was defined here
    …ansfer.go.com/cgi/transfer.dll?srvc=go&name=makeHP_button&goto=http://go.com/s…
  • Warning Line 605, Column 120: cannot generate system identifier for general entity "goto"
    …ansfer.dll?srvc=go&name=makeHP_button&goto=http://go.com/static/setHomepage.ht…

    An entity reference was found in the document, but there is no reference by that name defined. Often this is caused by misspelling the reference name, unencoded ampersands, or by leaving off the trailing semicolon (;). The most common cause of this error is unencoded ampersands in URLs as described by the WDG in "Ampersands in URLs".

    Entity references start with an ampersand (&) and end with a semicolon (;). If you want to use a literal ampersand in your document you must encode it as "&amp;" (even inside URLs!). Be careful to end entity references with a semicolon or your entity reference may get interpreted in connection with the following text. Also keep in mind that named entity references are case-sensitive; &Aelig; and &aelig; are different characters.

    If this error appears in some markup generated by PHP's session handling code, this article has explanations and solutions to your problem.

    Note that in most documents, errors related to entity references will trigger up to 5 separate messages from the Validator. Usually these will all disappear when the original problem is fixed.

  • Error Line 605, Column 120: general entity "goto" not defined and no default entity
    …ansfer.dll?srvc=go&name=makeHP_button&goto=http://go.com/static/setHomepage.ht…

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Error Line 605, Column 124: reference to entity "goto" for which no system identifier could be generated
    …er.dll?srvc=go&name=makeHP_button&goto=http://go.com/static/setHomepage.html" …

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Info Line 605, Column 119: entity was defined here
    …ransfer.dll?srvc=go&name=makeHP_button&goto=http://go.com/static/setHomepage.h…
  • Error Line 609, Column 184: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="1" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 614, Column 127: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="10" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 618, Column 77: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                                    <input type="hidden" name="srvc" value="go" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 619, Column 89: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …                     <input type="hidden" name="name" value="aa_search_home" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 620, Column 97: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …             <input type="hidden" name="trackingType" value="go_search_home" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 622, Column 79: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                                    <input type="text" name="p" class="searchBox" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 623, Column 113: cannot generate system identifier for general entity "fr"
    …dden" name="goto" value="http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&fr=hsusgo1" />

    An entity reference was found in the document, but there is no reference by that name defined. Often this is caused by misspelling the reference name, unencoded ampersands, or by leaving off the trailing semicolon (;). The most common cause of this error is unencoded ampersands in URLs as described by the WDG in "Ampersands in URLs".

    Entity references start with an ampersand (&) and end with a semicolon (;). If you want to use a literal ampersand in your document you must encode it as "&amp;" (even inside URLs!). Be careful to end entity references with a semicolon or your entity reference may get interpreted in connection with the following text. Also keep in mind that named entity references are case-sensitive; &Aelig; and &aelig; are different characters.

    If this error appears in some markup generated by PHP's session handling code, this article has explanations and solutions to your problem.

    Note that in most documents, errors related to entity references will trigger up to 5 separate messages from the Validator. Usually these will all disappear when the original problem is fixed.

  • Error Line 623, Column 113: general entity "fr" not defined and no default entity
    …dden" name="goto" value="http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&fr=hsusgo1" />

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Error Line 623, Column 115: reference to entity "fr" for which no system identifier could be generated
    …dden" name="goto" value="http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&fr=hsusgo1" />

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Info Line 623, Column 112: entity was defined here
    …dden" name="goto" value="http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&fr=hsusgo1" />
  • Warning Line 623, Column 125: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …dden" name="goto" value="http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&fr=hsusgo1" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 624, Column 151: there is no attribute "BORDER"
    …ges/goredesign2006/search.gif" border="0" onClick="_hbLink('SearchBtn');form.s…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Warning Line 624, Column 199: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …esign2006/search.gif" border="0" onClick="_hbLink('SearchBtn');form.submit()"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 628, Column 126: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="5" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 632, Column 120: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="5" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 638, Column 184: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="1" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 639, Column 116: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="5" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 643, Column 116: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …m/static/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="5" height="5" border="0"></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 652, Column 255: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    …+ adData.imagePath + '" border="0"></a>'; }</script><div id="ad_300x60_heading…

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 663, Column 43: document type does not allow element "STYLE" here
                        <style type="text/css">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 695, Column 26: end tag for element "DIV" which is not open
                        </div>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 702, Column 107: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 702, Column 107: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 711, Column 107: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 711, Column 107: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 737, Column 92: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 737, Column 92: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 758, Column 95: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 758, Column 95: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 794, Column 107: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 794, Column 107: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 813, Column 107: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 813, Column 107: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ted2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 817, Column 125: cannot generate system identifier for general entity "bhcp"
    …neyland/en_US/home/home?name=HomePage&bhcp=1">Disney Family Vacations</a> -- P…

    An entity reference was found in the document, but there is no reference by that name defined. Often this is caused by misspelling the reference name, unencoded ampersands, or by leaving off the trailing semicolon (;). The most common cause of this error is unencoded ampersands in URLs as described by the WDG in "Ampersands in URLs".

    Entity references start with an ampersand (&) and end with a semicolon (;). If you want to use a literal ampersand in your document you must encode it as "&amp;" (even inside URLs!). Be careful to end entity references with a semicolon or your entity reference may get interpreted in connection with the following text. Also keep in mind that named entity references are case-sensitive; &Aelig; and &aelig; are different characters.

    If this error appears in some markup generated by PHP's session handling code, this article has explanations and solutions to your problem.

    Note that in most documents, errors related to entity references will trigger up to 5 separate messages from the Validator. Usually these will all disappear when the original problem is fixed.

  • Error Line 817, Column 125: general entity "bhcp" not defined and no default entity
    …neyland/en_US/home/home?name=HomePage&bhcp=1">Disney Family Vacations</a> -- P…

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Error Line 817, Column 129: reference to entity "bhcp" for which no system identifier could be generated
    …and/en_US/home/home?name=HomePage&bhcp=1">Disney Family Vacations</a> -- Plan …

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Info Line 817, Column 124: entity was defined here
    …sneyland/en_US/home/home?name=HomePage&bhcp=1">Disney Family Vacations</a> -- …
  • Warning Line 828, Column 107: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ed2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div> 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 828, Column 107: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …ed2"><img src="http://go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/bluedot.gif"/></div> 

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 843, Column 116: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …m/static/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="5" height="5" border="0"></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 855, Column 94: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …p://family.go.com/video/travel/"><strong>Travel Destinations</strong></a><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 856, Column 83: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …a href="http://family.go.com/video/channel-disney-world">Disney World</a><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 857, Column 87: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ef="http://family.go.com/video/channel-national-parks">National Parks</a><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 858, Column 73: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
        <a href="http://family.go.com/video/channel-museums">Museums</a><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 859, Column 80: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …  <a href="http://family.go.com/video/channel-disneyland ">Disneyland</a><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 860, Column 85: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …http://family.go.com/video/channel-us-landmarks">U.S. Landmarks</a><br /><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 860, Column 91: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …http://family.go.com/video/channel-us-landmarks">U.S. Landmarks</a><br /><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 863, Column 110: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …m/video/entertainment/"><strong>Holiday Crafts &amp; Recipes</strong></a><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 864, Column 71: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
        <a href="http://family.go.com/video/channel-spring">Spring</a><br /> 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 865, Column 82: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …a href="http://family.go.com/video/channel-mothers-day">Mother's Day</a><br /> 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 866, Column 97: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …family.go.com/video/channel-cakes-and-cupcakes">Cakes &amp; Cupcakes</a><br /> 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 867, Column 82: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …a href="http://family.go.com/video/channel-schools-out">School's Out</a><br /> 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 872, Column 22: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                      <br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 875, Column 120: end tag for element "STYLE" which is not open
    …leheader">Weather <span class="moduleHeaderBy">by AccuWeather</style></td></tr>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 875, Column 125: end tag for "SPAN" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    …leheader">Weather <span class="moduleHeaderBy">by AccuWeather</style></td></tr>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 875, Column 70: start tag was here
    …span="3" class="moduleheader">Weather <span class="moduleHeaderBy">by AccuWeat…
  • Error Line 876, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="240" height="1" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 881, Column 54: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
                            <script language="javascript">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 887, Column 146: delimiter "'" invalid: only S separators and TAGC allowed here
    … type="text/javascript" src="modules/weatherJSbody?Zip='+zip+'"></scr'+'ipt>');
  • Error Line 887, Column 146: end tag for element "SCR" which is not open
    … type="text/javascript" src="modules/weatherJSbody?Zip='+zip+'"></scr'+'ipt>');

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 893, Column 138: delimiter "'" invalid: only S separators and TAGC allowed here
    …ascript" type="text/javascript" src="modules/weatherFormJSbody"></scr'+'ipt>');
  • Error Line 893, Column 138: end tag for element "SCR" which is not open
    …ascript" type="text/javascript" src="modules/weatherFormJSbody"></scr'+'ipt>');

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 900, Column 22: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                      <br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 916, Column 94: document type does not allow element "FORM" here
    …     <form action="" method="get" onsubmit="return goTo()" name="recipefinder">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 917, Column 53: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                        <tr style="padding-bottom: 3px;">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 922, Column 24: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                        <tr>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 930, Column 24: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                        <tr>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 932, Column 157: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …m/static/images/goredesign2006/go_family_logo.gif" border="0" alt="Food" /></a>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 938, Column 22: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                      <br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 942, Column 154: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="240" height="1" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 946, Column 22: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                      <br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 950, Column 142: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …go.com/static/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" height="1" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 951, Column 120: document type does not allow element "FORM" here
    …s" action="http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?" target="_self" method="post">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 952, Column 24: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                        <tr>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 956, Column 24: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                        <tr>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 957, Column 120: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …class="txtField" type="Text" name="address" size="12px" maxlength="80"  /></td>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 958, Column 115: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …nput class="txtField" type="Text" name="zipcode" size="6" maxlength="5" /></td>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 960, Column 24: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                        <tr>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 963, Column 24: document type does not allow element "TR" here
                        <tr>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 964, Column 115: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …nput class="txtField" type="Text" name="city" size="12px" maxlength="80"/></td>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1021, Column 149: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …om/static/images/goredesign2006/gobutton.gif" border="0" alt="Find Map" /></td>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1026, Column 22: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                      <br/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1029, Column 116: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …m/static/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="5" height="5" border="0"></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 1046, Column 124: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …tic/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="5" height="5" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 1057, Column 116: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …m/static/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="5" height="5" border="0"></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 1061, Column 116: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="5" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 1066, Column 127: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="10" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 1070, Column 77: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                                    <input type="hidden" name="srvc" value="go" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1071, Column 89: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …                     <input type="hidden" name="name" value="aa_search_home" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1072, Column 97: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …             <input type="hidden" name="trackingType" value="go_search_home" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1074, Column 79: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                                    <input type="text" name="p" class="searchBox" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1075, Column 115: reference to entity "fr" for which no system identifier could be generated
    …dden" name="goto" value="http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&fr=hsusgo1" />

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Info Line 623, Column 112: entity was defined here
    …dden" name="goto" value="http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&fr=hsusgo1" />
  • Warning Line 1075, Column 125: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …dden" name="goto" value="http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&fr=hsusgo1" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1076, Column 199: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …esign2006/search.gif" border="0" onClick="_hbLink('SearchBtn');form.submit()"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1080, Column 126: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="5" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 1084, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="10" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 1086, Column 51: cannot generate system identifier for general entity "lid"
    …<a href="http://family.go.com" name="&lid=network_footer_logo&lpos=fcom_logo" …

    An entity reference was found in the document, but there is no reference by that name defined. Often this is caused by misspelling the reference name, unencoded ampersands, or by leaving off the trailing semicolon (;). The most common cause of this error is unencoded ampersands in URLs as described by the WDG in "Ampersands in URLs".

    Entity references start with an ampersand (&) and end with a semicolon (;). If you want to use a literal ampersand in your document you must encode it as "&amp;" (even inside URLs!). Be careful to end entity references with a semicolon or your entity reference may get interpreted in connection with the following text. Also keep in mind that named entity references are case-sensitive; &Aelig; and &aelig; are different characters.

    If this error appears in some markup generated by PHP's session handling code, this article has explanations and solutions to your problem.

    Note that in most documents, errors related to entity references will trigger up to 5 separate messages from the Validator. Usually these will all disappear when the original problem is fixed.

  • Error Line 1086, Column 51: general entity "lid" not defined and no default entity
    …<a href="http://family.go.com" name="&lid=network_footer_logo&lpos=fcom_logo" …

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Error Line 1086, Column 54: reference to entity "lid" for which no system identifier could be generated
    …href="http://family.go.com" name="&lid=network_footer_logo&lpos=fcom_logo" tar…

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Info Line 1086, Column 50: entity was defined here
    … <a href="http://family.go.com" name="&lid=network_footer_logo&lpos=fcom_logo"…
  • Warning Line 1086, Column 75: cannot generate system identifier for general entity "lpos"
    …o.com" name="&lid=network_footer_logo&lpos=fcom_logo" target="_blank"><img src…

    An entity reference was found in the document, but there is no reference by that name defined. Often this is caused by misspelling the reference name, unencoded ampersands, or by leaving off the trailing semicolon (;). The most common cause of this error is unencoded ampersands in URLs as described by the WDG in "Ampersands in URLs".

    Entity references start with an ampersand (&) and end with a semicolon (;). If you want to use a literal ampersand in your document you must encode it as "&amp;" (even inside URLs!). Be careful to end entity references with a semicolon or your entity reference may get interpreted in connection with the following text. Also keep in mind that named entity references are case-sensitive; &Aelig; and &aelig; are different characters.

    If this error appears in some markup generated by PHP's session handling code, this article has explanations and solutions to your problem.

    Note that in most documents, errors related to entity references will trigger up to 5 separate messages from the Validator. Usually these will all disappear when the original problem is fixed.

  • Error Line 1086, Column 75: general entity "lpos" not defined and no default entity
    …o.com" name="&lid=network_footer_logo&lpos=fcom_logo" target="_blank"><img src…

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Error Line 1086, Column 79: reference to entity "lpos" for which no system identifier could be generated
    …m" name="&lid=network_footer_logo&lpos=fcom_logo" target="_blank"><img src="ht…

    This is usually a cascading error caused by a an undefined entity reference or use of an unencoded ampersand (&) in an URL or body text. See the previous message for further details.

  • Info Line 1086, Column 74: entity was defined here
    …go.com" name="&lid=network_footer_logo&lpos=fcom_logo" target="_blank"><img sr…
  • Warning Line 1086, Column 234: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …com_logo.gif" border="0" height="53" width="151" alt="Disney Family.com" /></a>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1088, Column 117: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="20" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 1102, Column 116: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …c/images/goredesign2006/clear.gif" width="770" height="5" border="0"></td></tr>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 1109, Column 58: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                &copy; Buena Vista.  All Rights Reserved.<br /><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 1109, Column 64: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
                &copy; Buena Vista.  All Rights Reserved.<br /><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 1118, Column 86: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    …uage="javascript" src="http://aglobal.go.com/stat/dolWebAnalytics.js"></script>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 1119, Column 34: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
        <script language="javascript">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 1141, Column 128: there is no attribute "BORDER"
    …_v1.html" width="1" height="1" border="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" scr…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 1141, Column 177: value of attribute "SCROLLING" cannot be "0"; must be one of "YES", "NO", "AUTO"
    … height="1" border="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" scrolling="0"></iframe>

    The value of the attribute is defined to be one of a list of possible values but in the document it contained something that is not allowed for that type of attribute. For instance, the “selected” attribute must be either minimized as “selected” or spelled out in full as “selected="selected"”; a value like “selected="true"” is not allowed.

Visitor Analysis

Daily Visitor
  • 1.796.667 visits