Runtime: 16:54 Runtime: 33:39 Runtime: 22:46 Runtime: 47:28 Runtime: 43:47 Runtime: 49:54 Runtime: 14:43 Runtime: 24:43 Runtime: 59:21 Runtime: 24:16 Runtime: 55:51 Runtime: 22:29 Runtime: 24:39 Runtime: 25:41 Runtime: 17:54 Runtime: 33:24 ... ...

cwtube.com
  • Domain Name
    cwtube.com
  • Favicon
  • Google Page Rank
    1
  • Alexa Rank
    #156643
  • Page Size
    14.8 KB
  • Ip Address
    108.162.196.79
  • Heading
    H1: 0, H2: 0, H3: 1, H4: 0, H5: 0, H6: 0
  • Images
    0 GIF, 87 JPG, 1 PNG

Website Meta Analysis

  • Title
    CWTube.com
  • Meta Keyword
  • Meta Description
    Runtime: 16:54 Runtime: 33:39 Runtime: 22:46 Runtime: 47:28 Runtime: 43:47 Runtime: 49:54 Runtime: 14:43 Runtime: 24:43 Runtime: 59:21 Runtime: 24:16 Runtime: 55:51 Runtime: 22:29 Runtime: 24:39 Runtime: 25:41 Runtime: 17:54 Runtime: 33:24 ...

Technical Analysis

  • Webserver
    cloudflare-nginx
  • Ip Address
    108.162.196.79
  • Domain Age
    1 Years, 1 Months, 6 days.
  • Javascript Library
  • Language used
    HTML, CSS, Javascript

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) header show data header response from cwtube.com.

HTML Analysis

  • server: cloudflare-nginx
  • date: Sun, 15 Sep 2013 14:46:19 GMT
  • content-type: text/html
  • connection: keep-alive
  • x-powered-by: PHP/5.2.17p1
  • vary: Accept-Encoding
  • cf-ray: ae61b0ff4a3059d
  • content-encoding: gzip
  • x-google-cache-control: remote-fetch
  • via: HTTP/1.1 GWA
Domain Name: CWTUBE.COM

Registration Date: 16-Aug-2012
Expiration Date: 16-Aug-2013

Status:LOCKED



Name Servers:
jay.ns.cloudflare.com
jean.ns.cloudflare.com


Registrant Contact Details:
PrivacyProtect.org
Domain Admin ( email )
ID#10760, PO Box 16
Note - Visit PrivacyProtect.org to contact the domain owner/operator
Nobby Beach
Queensland,QLD 4218
AU
Tel. +45.36946676

Administrative Contact Details:
PrivacyProtect.org
Domain Admin ( email )
ID#10760, PO Box 16
Note - Visit PrivacyProtect.org to contact the domain owner/operator
Nobby Beach
Queensland,QLD 4218
AU
Tel. +45.36946676

Technical Contact Details:
PrivacyProtect.org
Domain Admin ( email )
ID#10760, PO Box 16
Note - Visit PrivacyProtect.org to contact the domain owner/operator
Nobby Beach
Queensland,QLD 4218
AU
Tel. +45.36946676

Billing Contact Details:
PrivacyProtect.org
Domain Admin ( email )
ID#10760, PO Box 16
Note - Visit PrivacyProtect.org to contact the domain owner/operator
Nobby Beach
Queensland,QLD 4218
AU
Tel. +45.36946676

DNS Analysis


DNS servers
jay.ns.cloudflare.com
jean.ns.cloudflare.com


DNS Records

Answer records
cwtube.com NS  jean.ns.cloudflare.com 86400s
cwtube.com SOA
server: jay.ns.cloudflare.com
email: dns@cloudflare.com
serial: 2013012022
refresh: 10000
retry: 2400
expire: 604800
minimum ttl: 3600
86400s
cwtube.com NS  jay.ns.cloudflare.com 86400s
cwtube.com A 108.162.197.79 300s
cwtube.com A 108.162.196.79 300s

Authority records

Additional records

IP 108.162.196.79 Analysis

In Page Analysis

Traffic Analysis

Magestic Backlinks
Daily Ranks
Rank Trend
Visitor Trend
Bounce Trend

HTML Analysis

HTML validation
  • 218 Errors
  • 2 Warnings
Ratio Text/Html
  • 0.7529256198347107
Message Error
  • Error Line 5, Column 30: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <script language="JavaScript">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 12, Column 53: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <link href="s1.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 13, Column 7: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <style>A:link{COLOR:#D75711;TEXT-DECORATION:none}A:visited{COLOR:#0000A0;TEXT-D…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 13, Column 7: document type does not allow element "STYLE" here
    <style>A:link{COLOR:#D75711;TEXT-DECORATION:none}A:visited{COLOR:#0000A0;TEXT-D…

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 14, Column 7: end tag for element "HEAD" which is not open
    </head>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 24, Column 98: delimiter "'" invalid: only S separators and TAGC allowed here
    … + 'pt language="JavaScript" src="/tp/filter.php?pro='+ d +'"></sc' + 'ript>');
  • Error Line 24, Column 98: end tag for element "SC" which is not open
    … + 'pt language="JavaScript" src="/tp/filter.php?pro='+ d +'"></sc' + 'ript>');

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 25, Column 86: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …t><img src="/tp/img.php" width="0" height="0" style='display:none;border:none'>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 30, Column 42: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <td><div align="center"><img src=logo.png></div></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 34, Column 60: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    <a href="/tp/out.php?link=s195.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s195.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 34, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <a href="/tp/out.php?link=s195.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s195.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 35, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s489.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s489.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 35, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s489.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s489.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 36, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s276.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s276.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 36, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s276.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s276.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 37, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s275.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s275.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 37, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s275.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s275.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 38, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s041.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s041.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 38, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s041.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s041.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 39, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s325.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s325.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 39, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s325.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s325.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 40, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s217.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s217.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 40, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s217.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s217.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 41, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s391.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s391.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 41, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s391.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s391.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 42, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s073.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s073.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 42, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s073.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s073.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 43, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s516.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s516.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 43, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s516.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s516.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 44, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s075.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s075.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 44, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s075.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s075.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 45, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s262.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s262.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 45, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s262.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s262.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 46, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …6</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s485.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s485.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 46, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …6</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s485.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s485.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 47, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s007.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s007.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 47, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s007.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s007.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 48, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s333.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s333.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 48, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s333.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s333.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 49, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s023.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s023.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 49, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s023.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s023.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 50, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …4</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s150.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s150.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 50, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …4</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s150.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s150.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 51, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …4</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s006.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s006.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 51, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …4</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s006.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s006.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 52, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s121.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s121.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 52, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s121.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s121.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 53, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s504.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s504.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 53, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s504.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s504.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 54, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s409.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s409.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 54, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s409.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s409.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 55, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s340.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s340.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 55, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s340.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s340.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 56, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s349.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s349.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 56, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s349.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s349.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 57, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s244.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s244.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 57, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s244.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s244.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 58, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s049.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s049.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 58, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s049.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s049.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 59, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …4</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s204.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s204.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 59, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …4</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s204.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s204.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 60, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s338.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s338.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 60, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s338.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s338.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 61, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s347.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s347.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 61, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s347.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s347.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 62, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s069.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s069.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 62, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s069.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s069.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 63, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s238.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s238.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 63, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s238.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s238.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 64, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s260.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s260.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 64, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s260.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s260.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 65, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s118.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s118.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 65, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s118.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s118.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 66, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s289.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s289.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 66, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s289.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s289.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 67, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s116.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s116.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 67, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s116.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s116.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 68, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s065.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s065.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 68, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s065.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s065.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 69, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s064.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s064.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 69, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s064.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s064.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 70, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s435.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s435.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 70, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s435.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s435.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 71, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s273.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s273.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 71, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s273.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s273.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 72, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s408.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s408.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 72, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s408.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s408.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 73, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s498.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s498.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 73, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s498.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s498.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 74, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …4</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s232.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s232.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 74, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …4</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s232.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s232.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 75, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s292.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s292.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 75, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s292.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s292.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 76, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s400.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s400.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 76, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s400.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s400.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 77, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s450.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s450.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 77, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s450.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s450.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 78, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …6</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s100.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s100.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 78, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …6</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s100.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s100.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 79, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s312.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s312.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 79, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s312.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s312.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 80, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s470.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s470.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 80, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s470.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s470.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 81, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s014.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s014.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 81, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s014.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s014.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 82, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s337.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s337.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 82, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s337.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s337.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 83, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s248.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s248.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 83, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s248.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s248.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 84, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s356.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s356.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 84, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s356.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s356.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 85, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s141.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s141.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 85, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s141.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s141.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 86, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s345.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s345.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 86, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s345.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s345.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 87, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s031.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s031.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 87, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …8</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s031.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s031.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 88, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s201.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s201.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 88, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s201.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s201.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 89, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …4</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s211.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s211.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 89, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …4</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s211.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s211.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 90, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s240.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s240.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 90, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s240.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s240.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 91, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s432.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s432.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 91, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s432.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s432.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 92, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s461.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s461.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 92, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s461.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s461.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 93, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s071.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s071.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 93, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s071.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s071.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 94, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s392.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s392.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 94, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s392.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s392.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 95, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s206.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s206.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 95, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s206.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s206.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 96, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s377.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s377.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 96, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s377.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s377.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 97, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …6</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s390.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s390.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 97, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …6</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s390.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s390.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 98, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s364.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s364.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 98, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …7</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s364.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s364.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 99, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s017.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s017.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 99, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …5</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s017.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s017.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 100, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s114.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s114.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 100, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …1</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s114.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s114.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 101, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s268.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s268.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 101, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s268.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s268.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 102, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s032.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s032.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 102, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …0</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s032.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s032.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 103, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s494.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s494.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 103, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …2</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s494.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s494.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 104, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s093.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s093.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 104, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s093.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s093.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 105, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …6</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s221.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s221.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 105, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …6</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s221.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s221.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 106, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …6</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s358.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s358.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 106, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …6</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s358.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s358.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 107, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s373.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s373.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 107, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …9</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s373.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s373.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 108, Column 82: an attribute value must be a literal unless it contains only name characters
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s313.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s313.jpg>

    You have used a character that is not considered a "name character" in an attribute value. Which characters are considered "name characters" varies between the different document types, but a good rule of thumb is that unless the value contains only lower or upper case letters in the range a-z you must put quotation marks around the value. In fact, unless you have extreme file size requirements it is a very very good idea to always put quote marks around your attribute values. It is never wrong to do so, and very often it is absolutely necessary.

  • Error Line 108, Column 96: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …3</a><a href="/tp/out.php?link=s313.htm" target=_blank><img src=/safe/s313.jpg>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 121, Column 93: end tag for "FONT" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    …p" target="Traffic Trade"><font size="1" face="Verdana"><b>Trade</b></a></font>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 121, Column 48: start tag was here
    …/tp/trade.php" target="Traffic Trade"><font size="1" face="Verdana"><b>Trade</…
  • Error Line 121, Column 100: end tag for element "FONT" which is not open
    …p" target="Traffic Trade"><font size="1" face="Verdana"><b>Trade</b></a></font>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 125, Column 6: end tag for element "DIV" which is not open
    </div>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

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