Circulars Archive 2013 Circulars Compendium CBSE Updates Vol 1 CBSE Updates Vol 2 Publications Curriculum/Syllabus/ Sample Question Paper CBSE Quarterly Journal- CENBOSEC List of CBSE Latest Publications With Their Price Annual Report Newsletter ...

cbseacademic.in
  • Domain Name
    cbseacademic.in
  • Favicon
  • Google Page Rank
    5
  • Alexa Rank
    #67099
  • Page Size
    31.2 KB
  • Ip Address
    111.118.213.110
  • Heading
    H1: 0, H2: 2, H3: 2, H4: 0, H5: 0, H6: 0
  • Images
    3 GIF, 2 JPG, 0 PNG

Website Meta Analysis

  • Title
    CBSE | Central Board of Secondary Education : Academics
  • Meta Keyword
    cbseacad, Central Board of Secondary Education, Academic, Academic Unit, Academics Unit,CBSE Academic Unit, CBSE Website, CBSE Acad, CBSE New Delhi, Education Board, CBSE, Shiksha Sadan, 17, Rouse Avenue, New Delhi 110002, India
  • Meta Description
    Circulars Archive 2013 Circulars Compendium CBSE Updates Vol 1 CBSE Updates Vol 2 Publications Curriculum/Syllabus/ Sample Question Paper CBSE Quarterly Journal- CENBOSEC List of CBSE Latest Publications With Their Price Annual Report Newsletter ...

Technical Analysis

  • Webserver
    Microsoft-IIS/7.5
  • Ip Address
    111.118.213.110
  • Domain Age
  • Javascript Library
    jquery
  • Language used
    HTML, CSS, Javascript

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) header show data header response from cbseacademic.in.

HTML Analysis

  • content-type: text/html
  • content-encoding: gzip
  • last-modified: Fri, 06 Sep 2013 06:36:29 GMT
  • accept-ranges: bytes
  • etag: "167b556bcbaace1:0"
  • vary: Accept-Encoding
  • server: Microsoft-IIS/7.5
  • x-powered-by: ASP.NET
  • x-powered-by-plesk: PleskWin
  • date: Sun, 08 Sep 2013 05:48:15 GMT
  • content-length: 10044
  • x-google-cache-control: remote-fetch
  • via: HTTP/1.1 GWA
Access to .IN WHOIS information is provided to assist persons in
determining the contents of a domain name registration record in the
.IN registry database. The data in this record is provided by
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Domain ID:D5973850-AFIN
Domain Name:CBSEACADEMIC.IN
Created On:12-Mar-2012 10:31:00 UTC
Last Updated On:31-Dec-2012 10:25:13 UTC
Expiration Date:12-Mar-2016 10:31:00 UTC
Sponsoring Registrar:Directi Web Services Pvt. Ltd. (R118-AFIN)
Status:CLIENT TRANSFER PROHIBITED
Registrant ID:DI_21286544
Registrant Name:Navin Maini
Registrant Organization:Central Board of Secondary Education
Registrant Street1:Shiksha Sadan
Registrant Street2:17 Rouse Avenue
Registrant Street3:
Registrant City:New Delhi
Registrant State/Province:Delhi
Registrant Postal Code:110002
Registrant Country:IN
Registrant Phone:+91.01123211575
Registrant Phone Ext.:
Registrant FAX:
Registrant FAX Ext.:
Registrant Email: email
Admin ID:DI_21286544
Admin Name:Navin Maini
Admin Organization:Central Board of Secondary Education
Admin Street1:Shiksha Sadan
Admin Street2:17 Rouse Avenue
Admin Street3:
Admin City:New Delhi
Admin State/Province:Delhi
Admin Postal Code:110002
Admin Country:IN
Admin Phone:+91.01123211575
Admin Phone Ext.:
Admin FAX:
Admin FAX Ext.:
Admin Email: email
Tech ID:DI_21286544
Tech Name:Navin Maini
Tech Organization:Central Board of Secondary Education
Tech Street1:Shiksha Sadan
Tech Street2:17 Rouse Avenue
Tech Street3:
Tech City:New Delhi
Tech State/Province:Delhi
Tech Postal Code:110002
Tech Country:IN
Tech Phone:+91.01123211575
Tech Phone Ext.:
Tech FAX:
Tech FAX Ext.:
Tech Email: email
Name Server:WIN1.HOSTGATOR.IN
Name Server:WIN2.HOSTGATOR.IN
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
Name Server:
DNSSEC:Unsigned


DNS Analysis


DNS servers
win1.hostgator.in [111.118.213.110]
win2.hostgator.in [111.118.213.111]


DNS Records

Answer records
cbseacademic.in A 111.118.213.110 86400s
cbseacademic.in NS  win1.hostgator.in 86400s
cbseacademic.in NS  win2.hostgator.in 86400s
cbseacademic.in SOA
server: win1.hostgator.in
email: navincbse@gmail.com
serial: 1358503430
refresh: 10800
retry: 3600
expire: 604800
minimum ttl: 10800
86400s
cbseacademic.in MX
preference: 10
exchange: mail.cbseacademic.in
86400s
cbseacademic.in TXT J4Q-FtqsWOI7YLG5DXAv0BpYa9AbHHO9w4d9uZh4Or8 86400s

Authority records

Additional records
win1.hostgator.in A 111.118.213.110 86400s
win2.hostgator.in A 111.118.213.111 3600s
mail.cbseacademic.in A 111.118.213.110 86400s

IP 111.118.213.110 Analysis

  • Country Code
    IN
  • Country Code3
    IND
  • Country Name
    India
  • City
    AS
  • Continent Code
    20° North
  • Latitude
    77.
  • Longitude
  • % [whois.apnic.net node-2]
    % Whois data copyright terms http://www.apnic.net/db/dbcopyright.html

    inetnum: 111.118.212.1 - 111.118.215.200
    netname: HGPool
    descr: This is the assigned Hostgator IPs pool.
    country: IN
    admin-c: HIND1-AP
    tech-c: HIND1-AP
    status: ASSIGNED NON-PORTABLE
    notify: netadmin@hostgator.in
    mnt-by: MAINT-HGINDIA-AP
    mnt-lower: MAINT-HGINDIA-AP
    mnt-routes: MAINT-HGINDIA-AP
    mnt-irt: IRT-HGINDIA-AP
    changed: shashank@hostgator.com 20110209
    source: APNIC

    route: 111.118.212.0/22
    descr: Hostgator India Route
    origin: AS18229
    country: IN
    notify: netadmin@hostgator.in
    mnt-by: MAINT-HGINDIA-AP
    changed: hm-changed@apnic.net 20110201
    source: APNIC

    role: Hostgator India - Network Division
    address: Near Kings Park Layout, Maryhill, Mangalore 575 015, Karnataka, India
    country: IN
    phone: +91-824-6614111
    e-mail: abuse@hostgator.in
    admin-c: HIND1-AP
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In Page Analysis

Traffic Analysis

Magestic Backlinks
Daily Ranks
Rank Trend
Visitor Trend
Bounce Trend

HTML Analysis

HTML validation
  • 48 Errors
  • 29 Warnings
Ratio Text/Html
  • 0.32885632885632887
Message Error
  • Warning Line 5, Column 93: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …gle-site-verification" content="J4Q-FtqsWOI7YLG5DXAv0BpYa9AbHHO9w4d9uZh4Or8" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 5, Column 94: character data is not allowed here
    …gle-site-verification" content="J4Q-FtqsWOI7YLG5DXAv0BpYa9AbHHO9w4d9uZh4Or8" />

    You have used character data somewhere it is not permitted to appear. Mistakes that can cause this error include:

    • putting text directly in the body of the document without wrapping it in a container element (such as a <p>aragraph</p>), or
    • forgetting to quote an attribute value (where characters such as "%" and "/" are common, but cannot appear without surrounding quotes), or
    • using XHTML-style self-closing tags (such as <meta ... />) in HTML 4.01 or earlier. To fix, remove the extra slash ('/') character. For more information about the reasons for this, see Empty elements in SGML, HTML, XML, and XHTML.
  • Warning Line 11, Column 73: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <link type="text/css" href="resource/css/new_main.css" rel="stylesheet" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 162, Column 8: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <script>!function(d,s,id){

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 172, Column 8: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <script>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 199, Column 7: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <style>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 199, Column 7: document type does not allow element "STYLE" here
    <style>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 248, Column 23: document type does not allow element "STYLE" here
    <style type="text/css">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 264, Column 7: end tag for element "HEAD" which is not open
    </head>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 265, Column 6: document type does not allow element "BODY" here
    <body><div  class="main-container">

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 371, Column 5: end tag for element "LI" which is not open
    </li>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 373, Column 25: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br style="clear: left" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 373, Column 25: document type does not allow element "BR" here; assuming missing "LI" start-tag
    <br style="clear: left" />
  • Error Line 374, Column 7: end tag for "UL" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    	</div>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 271, Column 3: start tag was here
    		<ul>
  • Warning Line 408, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 418, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 418, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 421, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "2" cannot start a name
    <a id="25/01/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/9_Reg SA-II-2013.pdf" targ…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Warning Line 424, Column 6: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
     <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 428, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "2" cannot start a name
    <a id="25/01/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/9_Various_Clusters_Zones.p…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Error Line 428, Column 8: ID "25/01/2013" already defined
    <a id="25/01/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/9_Various_Clusters_Zones.p…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 421, Column 8: ID "25/01/2013" first defined here
    <a id="25/01/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/9_Reg SA-II-2013.pdf" targ…
  • Error Line 430, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "2" cannot start a name
    <a id="25/01/2013" href="https://www.cbseitms.in/login/login.aspx" target="_bla…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Error Line 430, Column 8: ID "25/01/2013" already defined
    <a id="25/01/2013" href="https://www.cbseitms.in/login/login.aspx" target="_bla…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 421, Column 8: ID "25/01/2013" first defined here
    <a id="25/01/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/9_Reg SA-II-2013.pdf" targ…
  • Warning Line 432, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 433, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 433, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 436, Column 9: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "0" cannot start a name
     <a id="04/02/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/12_logo_competition.pdf" …

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Warning Line 438, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 439, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 439, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 442, Column 9: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "1" cannot start a name
     <a id="14/02/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/13_oracle letter to websi…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Warning Line 445, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 447, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 447, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 450, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "1" cannot start a name
    <a id="14/02/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/15_Olabs.pdf" target="_bla…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Error Line 450, Column 8: ID "14/02/2013" already defined
    <a id="14/02/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/15_Olabs.pdf" target="_bla…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 442, Column 9: ID "14/02/2013" first defined here
     <a id="14/02/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/13_oracle letter to websi…
  • Warning Line 452, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 454, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 454, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 457, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "1" cannot start a name
    <a id="18/02/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/17_Evidence_of_Assessment.…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Warning Line 460, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 461, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 461, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 464, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "2" cannot start a name
    <a id="20/02/2013" href="web_material/Circulars/2013/18_EAsIX-X_TII.pdf" target…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Warning Line 467, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 507, Column 25: there is no attribute "DIRECTION"
    					<marquee direction="left" vspace="0" scrolldelay="160" onmouseover="stop()…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 507, Column 39: there is no attribute "VSPACE"
    					<marquee direction="left" vspace="0" scrolldelay="160" onmouseover="stop()…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 507, Column 55: there is no attribute "SCROLLDELAY"
    …rection="left" vspace="0" scrolldelay="160" onmouseover="stop()" onmouseout="s…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 507, Column 73: there is no attribute "ONMOUSEOVER"
    …ace="0" scrolldelay="160" onmouseover="stop()" onmouseout="start()" style="mar…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 507, Column 93: there is no attribute "ONMOUSEOUT"
    …"160" onmouseover="stop()" onmouseout="start()" style="margin-top:0" height="5…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 507, Column 109: there is no attribute "STYLE"
    …er="stop()" onmouseout="start()" style="margin-top:0" height="5%" width="100%">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 507, Column 131: there is no attribute "HEIGHT"
    …er="stop()" onmouseout="start()" style="margin-top:0" height="5%" width="100%">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 507, Column 142: there is no attribute "WIDTH"
    …er="stop()" onmouseout="start()" style="margin-top:0" height="5%" width="100%">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 507, Column 148: element "MARQUEE" undefined
    …er="stop()" onmouseout="start()" style="margin-top:0" height="5%" width="100%">

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  • Warning Line 515, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 515, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 518, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "2" cannot start a name
    <a id="20/02/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/8_CBSEChannel.pdf" tar…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Warning Line 521, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 521, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 523, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "2" cannot start a name
    <a id="20/02/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/7_PBL.pdf" target="_bl…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Error Line 523, Column 8: ID "20/02/2012" already defined
    <a id="20/02/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/7_PBL.pdf" target="_bl…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 518, Column 8: ID "20/02/2012" first defined here
    <a id="20/02/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/8_CBSEChannel.pdf" tar…
  • Warning Line 526, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 526, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 529, Column 9: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "0" cannot start a name
     <a id="03/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/5_CENBOSEC.pdf" targe…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Error Line 529, Column 131: non SGML character number 150
    …viting articles for CENBOSEC (January – March 2013) based on the theme ‘Gender…

    You have used an illegal character in your text. HTML uses the standard UNICODE Consortium character repertoire, and it leaves undefined (among others) 65 character codes (0 to 31 inclusive and 127 to 159 inclusive) that are sometimes used for typographical quote marks and similar in proprietary character sets. The validator has found one of these undefined characters in your document. The character may appear on your browser as a curly quote, or a trademark symbol, or some other fancy glyph; on a different computer, however, it will likely appear as a completely different character, or nothing at all.

    Your best bet is to replace the character with the nearest equivalent ASCII character, or to use an appropriate character entity. For more information on Character Encoding on the web, see Alan Flavell's excellent HTML Character Set Issues reference.

    This error can also be triggered by formatting characters embedded in documents by some word processors. If you use a word processor to edit your HTML documents, be sure to use the "Save as ASCII" or similar command to save the document without formatting information.

  • Error Line 529, Column 164: non SGML character number 145
    …(January – March 2013) based on the theme ‘Gender Sensitization in Schools’</a>

    You have used an illegal character in your text. HTML uses the standard UNICODE Consortium character repertoire, and it leaves undefined (among others) 65 character codes (0 to 31 inclusive and 127 to 159 inclusive) that are sometimes used for typographical quote marks and similar in proprietary character sets. The validator has found one of these undefined characters in your document. The character may appear on your browser as a curly quote, or a trademark symbol, or some other fancy glyph; on a different computer, however, it will likely appear as a completely different character, or nothing at all.

    Your best bet is to replace the character with the nearest equivalent ASCII character, or to use an appropriate character entity. For more information on Character Encoding on the web, see Alan Flavell's excellent HTML Character Set Issues reference.

    This error can also be triggered by formatting characters embedded in documents by some word processors. If you use a word processor to edit your HTML documents, be sure to use the "Save as ASCII" or similar command to save the document without formatting information.

  • Error Line 529, Column 196: non SGML character number 146
    …(January – March 2013) based on the theme ‘Gender Sensitization in Schools’</a>

    You have used an illegal character in your text. HTML uses the standard UNICODE Consortium character repertoire, and it leaves undefined (among others) 65 character codes (0 to 31 inclusive and 127 to 159 inclusive) that are sometimes used for typographical quote marks and similar in proprietary character sets. The validator has found one of these undefined characters in your document. The character may appear on your browser as a curly quote, or a trademark symbol, or some other fancy glyph; on a different computer, however, it will likely appear as a completely different character, or nothing at all.

    Your best bet is to replace the character with the nearest equivalent ASCII character, or to use an appropriate character entity. For more information on Character Encoding on the web, see Alan Flavell's excellent HTML Character Set Issues reference.

    This error can also be triggered by formatting characters embedded in documents by some word processors. If you use a word processor to edit your HTML documents, be sure to use the "Save as ASCII" or similar command to save the document without formatting information.

  • Warning Line 532, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 532, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 534, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "0" cannot start a name
    <a id="03/01/2012" href="web_material/Voc/A day long training programme on NLT.…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Error Line 534, Column 8: ID "03/01/2012" already defined
    <a id="03/01/2012" href="web_material/Voc/A day long training programme on NLT.…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 529, Column 9: ID "03/01/2012" first defined here
     <a id="03/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/5_CENBOSEC.pdf" targe…
  • Warning Line 538, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 538, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 541, Column 9: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "0" cannot start a name
     <a id="09/01/2012" href="web_material/doc/Merit List (MO-2012).pdf" target="_b…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Warning Line 544, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 544, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 546, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "0" cannot start a name
    <a id="03/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/4_HORNBY.pdf" target="…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Error Line 546, Column 8: ID "03/01/2012" already defined
    <a id="03/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/4_HORNBY.pdf" target="…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 529, Column 9: ID "03/01/2012" first defined here
     <a id="03/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/5_CENBOSEC.pdf" targe…
  • Error Line 546, Column 124: non SGML character number 0
    …ations/2013/4_HORNBY.pdf" target="_blank">The Hornby Scholarship 2013-2014</a>

    You have used an illegal character in your text. HTML uses the standard UNICODE Consortium character repertoire, and it leaves undefined (among others) 65 character codes (0 to 31 inclusive and 127 to 159 inclusive) that are sometimes used for typographical quote marks and similar in proprietary character sets. The validator has found one of these undefined characters in your document. The character may appear on your browser as a curly quote, or a trademark symbol, or some other fancy glyph; on a different computer, however, it will likely appear as a completely different character, or nothing at all.

    Your best bet is to replace the character with the nearest equivalent ASCII character, or to use an appropriate character entity. For more information on Character Encoding on the web, see Alan Flavell's excellent HTML Character Set Issues reference.

    This error can also be triggered by formatting characters embedded in documents by some word processors. If you use a word processor to edit your HTML documents, be sure to use the "Save as ASCII" or similar command to save the document without formatting information.

  • Warning Line 549, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 549, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 551, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "0" cannot start a name
    <a id="02/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/2_NGCD.pdf" target="_b…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Error Line 553, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "0" cannot start a name
    <a id="02/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/2_Annexure 'A'.pdf" ta…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Error Line 553, Column 8: ID "02/01/2012" already defined
    <a id="02/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/2_Annexure 'A'.pdf" ta…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 551, Column 8: ID "02/01/2012" first defined here
    <a id="02/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/2_NGCD.pdf" target="_b…
  • Error Line 555, Column 8: value of attribute "ID" invalid: "0" cannot start a name
    <a id="02/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/2_Annexure 'B'.pdf" ta…

    It is possible that you violated the naming convention for this attribute. For example, id and name attributes must begin with a letter, not a digit.

  • Error Line 555, Column 8: ID "02/01/2012" already defined
    <a id="02/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/2_Annexure 'B'.pdf" ta…

    An "id" is a unique identifier. Each time this attribute is used in a document it must have a different value. If you are using this attribute as a hook for style sheets it may be more appropriate to use classes (which group elements) than id (which are used to identify exactly one element).

  • Info Line 551, Column 8: ID "02/01/2012" first defined here
    <a id="02/01/2012" href="web_material/Notifications/2013/2_NGCD.pdf" target="_b…
  • Warning Line 558, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 558, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 559, Column 48: there is no attribute "BORDER"
    …feedback.html" target="_blank" border="0" width="45" height="30"/><font color=…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 559, Column 58: there is no attribute "WIDTH"
    …tml" target="_blank" border="0" width="45" height="30"/><font color="blue" siz…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 559, Column 70: there is no attribute "HEIGHT"
    …"_blank" border="0" width="45" height="30"/><font color="blue" size="2px"><b>F…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Warning Line 559, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ank" border="0" width="45" height="30"/><font color="blue" size="2px"><b>Feedb…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 561, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 561, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 565, Column 129: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ding schools hyderabad.pdf" target="_blank" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 568, Column 112: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …s/2012/26_iim/deli bro.pdf" target="_blank" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 571, Column 134: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …School - Dubai (Final).pdf" target="_blank" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 576, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 576, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 577, Column 117: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ank" border="0" width="45" height="30"/><font color="blue" size="2px"><b>Gener…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 581, Column 74: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 581, Column 74: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    <img src="resource/images/new_star.gif" border="0" width="45" height="30"/>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 582, Column 108: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ank" border="0" width="45" height="30"/><font color="blue" size="2px"><b>"Figh…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 587, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 588, Column 44: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    					<img src="resource/images/header.jpg" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 588, Column 44: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    					<img src="resource/images/header.jpg" />

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 593, Column 14: there is no attribute "WIDTH"
    			<tr width="900">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 595, Column 16: end tag for "TR" which is not finished
              	</tr>

    Most likely, you nested tags and closed them in the wrong order. For example <p><em>...</p> is not acceptable, as <em> must be closed before <p>. Acceptable nesting is: <p><em>...</em></p>

    Another possibility is that you used an element which requires a child element that you did not include. Hence the parent element is "not finished", not complete. For instance, in HTML the <head> element must contain a <title> child element, lists require appropriate list items (<ul> and <ol> require <li>; <dl> requires <dt> and <dd>), and so on.

  • Error Line 608, Column 72: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    						  <img src="" name="Rotating" id="Rotating1" width=100 height=100>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 612, Column 32: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
      <script language="JavaScript">

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 632, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 659, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 680, Column 37: document type does not allow element "H2" here; missing one of "APPLET", "OBJECT", "MAP", "IFRAME", "BUTTON" start-tag
    				  					<font color="#FF6600"><h2>CBSE VISION</h2></font>

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Warning Line 684, Column 13: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
      					 <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 685, Column 32: document type does not allow element "H2" here; missing one of "APPLET", "OBJECT", "MAP", "IFRAME", "BUTTON" start-tag
    					 <font color="#009900"><h2>About Academics Unit</h2></font>

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  • Warning Line 688, Column 12: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    </font><br /><br /> 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 688, Column 18: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    </font><br /><br /> 

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 689, Column 91: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …lor="#0033CC"><B >Some major objectives of the Unit are:</B></font><br /><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 689, Column 97: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …lor="#0033CC"><B >Some major objectives of the Unit are:</B></font><br /><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 696, Column 175: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …and holistic education to all children  without compromising on quality  <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 697, Column 123: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …demic activities  by collecting the feedback from different stakeholders <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 698, Column 293: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ademic activities and to supervise other agencies involved in the process<br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 699, Column 138: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ence in conformity with psychological, pedagogical and social principles.<br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 700, Column 105: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …document the progress of students in a teacher and student friendly way  <br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 701, Column 110: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …quality benchmarks in school education consistent with the National goals<br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 702, Column 124: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    … empowerment programmes to update the professional competency of teachers<br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 706, Column 22: end tag for "TABLE" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    </table></div>		</div>  			</td>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 602, Column 13: start tag was here
                <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0">
  • Error Line 706, Column 22: end tag for "TABLE" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    </table></div>		</div>  			</td>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 592, Column 3: start tag was here
    		<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
  • Error Line 706, Column 32: end tag for element "TD" which is not open
    </table></div>		</div>  			</td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 708, Column 18: end tag for element "TR" which is not open
                	</tr>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 711, Column 16: document type does not allow element "TR" here
              		<tr>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 713, Column 19: end tag for "TR" which is not finished
                 	</tr>

    Most likely, you nested tags and closed them in the wrong order. For example <p><em>...</p> is not acceptable, as <em> must be closed before <p>. Acceptable nesting is: <p><em>...</em></p>

    Another possibility is that you used an element which requires a child element that you did not include. Hence the parent element is "not finished", not complete. For instance, in HTML the <head> element must contain a <title> child element, lists require appropriate list items (<ul> and <ol> require <li>; <dl> requires <dt> and <dd>), and so on.

  • Error Line 717, Column 20: end tag for element "TABLE" which is not open
                </table>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 720, Column 14: end tag for element "TD" which is not open
             </td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 722, Column 60: document type does not allow element "TD" here
    <td align="center" valign="top" width="10"  class="block"  >

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 725, Column 72: document type does not allow element "TD" here
    …ign="center" valign="top" width="200"  class="block"  ><!--  block-bacground-->

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Warning Line 731, Column 34: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <p><input name="q" type="hidden" />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 732, Column 55: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ont" type="text" style="width: 120px" /> <input type="submit" value="Search" /…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 732, Column 94: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    … type="text" style="width: 120px" /> <input type="submit" value="Search" /></p>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 752, Column 16: end tag for element "TD" which is not open
               </td>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 754, Column 15: end tag for element "TR" which is not open
              </tr>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 755, Column 14: document type does not allow element "TR" here
              <tr>

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  • Error Line 762, Column 16: end tag for element "TABLE" which is not open
            </table> 

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 764, Column 7: end tag for "CENTER" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    	</div>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 266, Column 2: start tag was here
    	<center>
  • Error Line 777, Column 8: end tag for element "DIV" which is not open
    		</div>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 778, Column 10: end tag for element "CENTER" which is not open
    	</center>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 779, Column 6: end tag for element "DIV" which is not open
    </div></body>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

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